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  • A breath test was found to accurately predict whether children had chemical byproducts of a condition associated with type 1 diabetes.

  • It's not often you hear positive things about the Internet, but this study found increased use can improve cognition among older adults.

  • It’s like clockwork: You’re done polishing off a plate (OK, two) of Thanksgiving dinner — turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, a vegetable, hopefully, all topped with gravy — and as soon as you sit back to take a breath, you have a single thought: I’m sleepy.

    Turkey, as you most likely know, is a source of the naturally occurring amino acid called tryptophan. Scientific American reported tryptophan is used by the human body to make the neurotransmitter serotonin, otherwise known as a feel-good chemical. Serotonin affects appetite as much as it affects mood and behavior.

    Some studies have shown serotonin is “the promotion of slow-wave sleep in non-human mammals…and it may do the same for humans.” Other experts find tryptophan is a precursor to the sleep hormone melatonin. While turkey and tryptophan are almost synonymous at this point, the bird ranks 55 on SELF’s nutrition database. Spinach, soy, eggs, cheddar cheese, fish, watercress, other meats, and tofu are foods much higher in tryptophan than turkey.

    Here's another thing about eating turkey: it doesn't translate to amplified serotonin production in the brain, Richard Wurtman, a neuropharmacologist of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences in Cambridge, Mass., told SA. "Turkey and other protein-rich foods contain many amino acids, and tryptophan is the scarcest among them," he said.

    Wurtman added of the amino acids trying to make their way to your brain, tryptophan has the lowest odds. Instead, he points a finger at carbohydrates (see: the dessert table). Carbs increase serotonin release, hence why we crave them when our levels are low. Other experts, however, blame fat. Mental Floss reported “fats take a lot of energy to digest, so the body redirects blood to the digestive systems,” and reduced blood flow in the body means reduced energy. Let’s not forget alcohol either. One or two beers or glasses of wine increases the slow-wave sleep we mentioned earlier.

    The truth is, Thanksgiving dinner as a whole is what makes you so sleepy. Or rather, over-eating Thanksgiving dinner is what makes you so sleepy. "Studies have indicated that stretching of the small intestine induces sleepiness and a protein–fat loading of the stomach induces sleepiness," H. Craig Heller, a biologist, at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., said, “and, more blood going to the gastrointestinal tract means less going elsewhere.”

    Considering the fact tryptophan induces sleep when combined with other ingredients, such as carbs, fat, and/or alcohol, while also consumed in large quantities, we looked into other foods found to promote sleep — holiday or not.

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    why, does, turkey, make, you, sleepy, answer, plus, other, foods, put, you, bed
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    Oatmeal
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    "Grains in oatmeal trigger insulin production much like whole-grain bread," Cynthia Pasquella, CCN, told Good Housekeeping. "They raise your blood sugar naturally and make you feel sleepy. Oats are also rich in melatonin, which relaxes the body and helps you fall asleep."

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    Honey
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    GH reported honey contains glucose, "which tells your brain to shut off orexin — the chemical known to trigger alertness." A tablespoon can be enough to make you sleepy.

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    Nuts
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    Almonds and walnuts both contain tryptophan, while almonds also contain the "relaxing mineral" magnesium. Walnuts, on the other hand, contain their own source of melatonin, according to research from the University of Texas.

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    Jasmine Rice
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    Reader's Digest cited research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found people who ate a meal with jasmine rice fell asleep faster than those eating other types of rice.

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    Cherry juice
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    Dan Klimke/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
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    "Beyond antioxidants, cherries are the only natural source of melatonin, a hormone that regulates the body's internal block and sleep-wake cycles," nutritionist Rania Batayneh, author of The One One One Diet, previously told Medical Daily, On the other hand, The University of Pennsylvania and University of Rochester found tart cherry juice leads to sleep, too.

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  • Once a cancerous tumor has grown in one area of the body, it travels to other organs. This process is known as metastasis, and it occurs via three different routes.

  • Autism is a complicated disorder to figure out, but researchers have found how a missing gene affects those with the disorder.

  • No matter how we feel about the violent aftermath following the Ferguson decision, it would be hard to argue against the influence of the media and its encouragement of a more violent society.

  • New implantable medical device that dissolves safely in the body after use could treat bacterial infections using a “wi-fi” drug delivery method.

  • Researchers have discovered how our brains interpret time while dreaming.

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