Christians Face Even More Trying Times in Egypt During Ramadan

To say that these days are not the best ones for Christians in Egypt is certainly an understatement.

(PHOTO: REUTERS/MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY)Mourners gathered at the Sacred Family Church for the funeral of Coptic Christians who were killed in Minya, Egypt, on May 26, 2017.

Aside from being specifically targeted for killing by local Islamist extremists linked to the Islamic State (ISIS) terrorist group, Christians in Egypt are also feeling the heat from most Muslims at this time of the year when the Muslim world celebrates its fasting month of Ramadan, which began on May 26 and will end on June 24.

According to Open Doors USA, Ramadan is a challenging month for Christians in Egypt since the country's predominant Muslim population tend to become stricter and less tolerant towards Christians at this time of the year.

A Christian living in Egypt would readily notice that the volume of loudspeakers in mosques calling on the public to pray is raised higher during Ramadan. A Christian would also notice the "glaring looks of fasting Muslims," the Christian charity says.

During Ramadan, many Muslims read their Quran out loud, particularly those passages that speak about Christians and Jews—"those infidels"—going to hell, for Christians to hear.

Open Doors says by doing this, Muslims believe they will earn additional points from their Allah.

A Christian woman taking the bus commute would not fail to notice the "despising looks" of the passengers. If the bus is full, no one is expected to offer her a seat as is customary in other places.

In Egyptian offices where they work, Christians can expect to be provoked and intimidated by their Muslim colleagues, the charity says.

Ramadan is supposed to be a month for Muslims to show charity to others and closeness to God, but for some extremist believers it has become an open season for killing Christians worldwide.

According to the Quran, good deeds are "given manifold reward" during Ramadan. However, Muslim radicals have twisted this point to include jihadi attacks as part of good Muslim deeds, The Independent reported.

The British news outlet said this started during the observance of Ramadan in 2015 when then ISIS spokesperson Abu Muhammad al-Adnani put out a call for terror attacks to mark the Islamic holy month. Adnani was killed in a US air strike in Syria in July 2016.

Since then, Ramadan has become increasingly bloody, according to The Independent.

During this year's Ramadan, nearly 200 civilians have already lost their lives in extremist attacks around the world, the news outlet reported.

These included the London Bridge attack and the bombing of Ariana Grande's concert in Manchester, all claimed by ISIS.