Democratic Senator Cites Ephesians 6 to Argue for Fighting Gov't Authority

(Photo: Reuters/Yuri Gripas)Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., speaks at EMILY's List 30th Anniversary National Conference in Washington March 3, 2015.

A Democratic United States Senator recently argued in favor of resisting the Trump Administration by referencing Ephesians 6.

Speaking at First Corinthian Baptist Church of Harlem on Sunday, New York Democrat Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand spoke about the reported rise in hate crimes across the nation, tying it to current administration.

"This onslaught of hate [is] coming out from every direction in Washington, the highest places in this country," stated Sen. Gillibrand to those gathered at the historically African-American church.

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Gillibrand went on to cite Ephesians 6:12, which reads, "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."

Gillibrand delivered a slightly modified version of the passage. 

"The struggle is not against the flesh and blood, but against the rulers, the authorities and the powers of this dark world," continued Gillibrand, as reported by thegrio.com.

"It's time that we take a stand. We take action. We stand up to the bullying. We stand up to the hateful words. We protect those least among us. We protect the vulnerable."

Gillibrand's apparent application of the Ephesians passage to resisting the "onslaught of hate" from Capitol Hill contrasts with how theologian Michael Brown describes the passage.

In a column published by The Christian Post last week, Brown explained that Ephesians 6:12 referred to a "spiritual battle" rather than a "political battle."

"Organized cosmic powers of darkness? Demonic forces arrayed in heavenly places? We're supposed to take this stuff seriously? Absolutely. We ignore the spiritual realm to the peril of our own souls," wrote Brown.

"Again, we should get involved politically, and what our political and judicial leaders do is of great importance. But let's not kid ourselves. There's only so much these elected (and unelected) officials can do."

Gillibrand's comments come at a time when some believe that, with the election of Donald Trump and Republicans taking more control of Congress, progressives will turn more to the Religious Left as a force in American politics.

Bishop John Selders, vice chair of the board for the theologically liberal Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, believes that there has been an upsurge in support since Trump's victory.

In an interview with The Christian Post last December, Bishop Selders said that he believed it was part of a larger trend in American politics, going back at least for the past few decades.

"I think we can take a recent step back into history to see that every time the larger broader secular community makes a swing either to the left or to the right, the religious community in the most broadest way, swings the opposite direction," said Selders.

"It goes kind of back and forth. What we are seeing certainly in preparation to the president-elect's coming into office is the same kind of story."

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