Fire in Reno Razes Over 30 Homes

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    (Reuters/Max Whittaker)
    Firefighter Tony Shaw of the Reno Fire Department sprays water at a burned home after a wildfire in Reno, Nevada November 18, 2011. Nevada's governor declared a state of emergency on Friday because of the wildfire burning out of control outside of Reno that has destroyed more than 30 structures, forced more than 10,000 people from their homes and was blamed for the death of one man.
By Emma Koonse, Christian Post Reporter
November 20, 2011|2:34 pm

At least 32 homes in Reno, Nevada have been destroyed by a wildfire on Friday, and a fire expert has told The Christian Post what homeowners in the region can do to minimize the risks to their homes.

The out-of-season blaze was spread through an upscale community in the Sierra foothills southwest of Reno after being spread by gale force winds early Friday morning. Several injuries were reported and emergency personnel officials described battling the flames as being very difficult. Fire Chief Michael Hernandez said fire crews had a tough time “getting ahead of” the blaze which covered 400-acres.

Many homes have been lost to wildfires across the U.S. this year. In August, hundreds of people in northern Texas, California, and Oklahoma were forced from their homes as over two dozen buildings were lost to fire in August.

Typically, fire season lasts from August until November and present risks to the southwest, especially during droughts and high temperatures.

Fire expert Robert L. Rowe spoke with The Christian Post about ways to minimize the risks wildfires present to homeowners, listing an approved automatic fire sprinkler system as the most important tool for preventing property damage.

Rowe said that residents of wildfire-threatened areas should assess their community’s ability to respond in emergency situations by asking questions. Rowe advised: “Are roads leading to your property clearly marked? Are the roads wide enough to allow firefighting equipment to get through? Is your house visible from the roadside?”

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Residents should also always be prepared for an emergency evacuation, which is often the only way to avoid danger.

“Know where to go and what to bring with you. You should plan several escape routes in case roads are blocked by wildfire,” said Rowe.

For more information about preventing damage by wildfires, view firewise.gvpi.net, or visit the FEMA website, where each state, county, and city has their own code and regulation.

 

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