Full Moon to Be Broadcast from Canary Islands: Watch Lunar Event Online

0
Sign Up for Free eNewsletter ››
  • The moon is seen during the September or autumnal equinox at the Kokino megalithic observatory, in the northwestern town of Kumanovo, 70 km (43 miles) north from Skopje.
    (Photo: Reuters/Ognen Teofilovski)
    The moon is seen during the September or autumnal equinox at the Kokino megalithic observatory, in the northwestern town of Kumanovo, 70 km (43 miles) north from Skopje.
By Myles Collier, Christian Post Contributor
February 25, 2013|1:32 pm

In anticipation of February's Full Snow Moon, a popular space observatory will be broadcasting the event over the internet as novice astronomers anticipate the annual event.

The full moon will occur Feb. 25, with this full moon being the only one of the month. This particular lunar phase is similar to others that occur throughout the year with the timing of the event being the reason for its naming.

The Full Snow Moon is named as such because of when it takes place and due to the winter month providing for the heaviest snow falls this time of year. The moon is also referred to as the Full Hunger Moon due to snowy conditions that made hunting difficult for ancient tribes, leaving some civilizations short on food.

With the advent of the internet, those who would be unable to view the event due to poor atmospheric conditions or physical location will be able to observe the celestial body. It can be viewed from the webcast produced from an observatory located off the African coast in the Canary islands.

Slooh.com will be broadcasting the Full Snow Moon live from a telescope starting at 3:30 p.m. ET for free and the moon will be directly opposite of the sun and fully illuminated at 3:26 p.m. ET.

"Using our observatory in the Canary Islands, we will explore the Full Snow Moon, sometimes known as the Hunger Moon, with fascinating stories by astronomer Bob Berman," Patrick Paolucci, Slooh president, told Space.com.

Follow us Get CP eNewsletter ››

The online Slooh Space Camera broadcasts weekly shows highlighting the wonders of the universe. The project began on Christmas in 2003 and has broadcast various cosmic events such as passing asteroids and comets to newly discovered stars. They have a number of contributors that provide explanations and video demonstrations of celestial occurrences in all their wonder and glory.

To watch the live web broadcast click here.

 

Videos that May Interest You

‘Son of God Preview: Evangelical Leader Geoff Tunnicliffe on Last Supper Scene; Christian Apologetics Tool?

Advertisement