Harvard University Recognizes 'Kinky' Sex Club as Official Student Group

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    (Photo: Courtesy of Harvard University)
    Established in 1636, Harvard is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States. The University, which is based in Cambridge and Boston, Massachusetts, has an enrollment of over 20,000 degree candidates, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Harvard has more than 360,000 alumni around the world.
By Katherine Weber, Christian Post Reporter
December 6, 2012|1:51 pm

For the first time in its 376-year history, Harvard University has officially recognized the Harvard College Munch, a student group that advocates safe practices for alternative, kinky sex.

"Applications for recognition are decided by a student-faculty committee following the review of a committee composed of students and administrators," Jeff Neal, a spokesperson of the university, said in a statement released Tuesday, as reported by The Associated Press.  

"The college does not endorse the views or activities of any independent student organization," Neal added.

The club, which is set to be approved Dec. 7 by the university's Committee on Student Life, will now be able to meet for discussion on the school's campus, apply for grants, and promote itself around the university.

The club's founder, "Michael," who chose to keep his real name anonymous, told university newspaper The Harvard Crimson that the most rewarding aspect of being officially recognized as a student group is "the fact of legitimacy," adding "[our recognition] shows we are being taken seriously."

The club, which is now among the university's 400 independent student groups on campus, reportedly began last year as a group of seven students meeting in crowded dining halls to discuss their affinity for kinky sex.

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Now, the club's membership has nearly quadrupled to 30 members.

According to a statement posted on the Harvard College Munch's official website, the new group both creates a community for those interested in kinky sex, as well as provides a safe haven for those possibly suffering from damaging or negative kinky sex experiences.

"It exists to promote a positive and accurate understanding of alternative sexualities and kink on campus, as well as to create a space where college-age adults may reach out to their peers and feel accepted in their own sexuality," the statement read.

"Though existing campus groups range from representing women and men, queer sexualities and orientations, all the way to groups dedicated to abstinence, no other group exists as a forum for students interested in alternative sexualities to explore their identities and develop a community with their peers," the statement adds.

Although many have voiced their support for the Harvard College Munch, not all students at Harvard University agree with the club's official recognition.

"At the end of the day, Harvard is a private institution [..] I understand the university feels it would be wrong to deny this group funding, but a serious line has been crossed," Devi Nair, vice president of the Harvard Republicans Club, told The Harvard Crimson.

"Allowing for such a group tacitly ignores the fact that [...] modern society still promotes certain boundaries. Allowing for a kinky sex group will only foster similar, if not more extreme clubs within our community," Nair added.

This is not the first time a BDSM (bondage, discipline, sadism, and masochism) club has been officially approved by a university.

In 2003, the Iowa State University's student leaders chose to fund Cuffs, a student-run group that taught about bondage and other sexual fetishes.

 

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