Hobby Lobby Releases Video Arguing for Their Opposition to HHS Mandate

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  • Steve Green
    (Photo: The Christian Post/Napp Nazworth)
    Steve Green, president of Hobby Lobby, speaking at Faith & Freedom Coalition's "Road to Majority 2013" conference, June 15, 2013, Washington, D.C.
  • Hobby Lobby
    (Photo: The Becket Fund)
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By Michael Gryboski, Christian Post Reporter
February 6, 2014|1:31 pm

A major crafts retail chain run by a devout Christian family has released a video online putting forth their argument against being compelled to adhere to the Department of Health and Human Services' "preventive services" mandate.

Hobby Lobby Inc., a crafts chain run by the Green family of Oklahoma, posted the video on YouTube on their "Hobby Lobby Case" account last Thursday.

Titled "Hobby Lobby: A Family Business," the four and a half minute video presents an overview of the company as well as interviews from Green family members about their lawsuit against the HHS.

"On March 25, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores Inc., a case arising out of the commitment of Hobby Lobby owners David and Barbara Green and their family to live out their deeply held religious convictions by 'operating their company in a manner consistent with biblical principles,'" reads the video's description.

"The family believes that this commitment is the reason that Hobby Lobby, which began out of the garage, has grown from one 300-square-foot store to one of the nation's leading arts and crafts retailers with more than 550 stores in 45 states."

In less than a week, "Hobby Lobby: A Family Business" garnered over 10,000 views, making it the second-most viewed video among the six posted by the "Hobby Lobby Case" account.

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In September 2012 the Green family filed a suit against HHS in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma over the controversial mandate.

At issue for the Greens is the mandate to provide the "morning after" and "week after" pills, which are considered abortion-inducing and therefore against the family's pro-life views.

Hobby Lobby President Steve Green told The Christian Post in an earlier interview that "our Founders gave us the religious freedoms that we have today, and as a business we have the right to live according to those freedoms."

Hobby Lobby is being represented by the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which is overseeing several other lawsuits against the HHS mandate by various parties.

Last November, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear the Hobby Lobby case along with the appeal of another suit against the HHS by Conestoga Woods Specialties Corporation.

In late January, several individuals and groups filed amicus briefs to the highest court in the land, both for and against Hobby Lobby.

Parties supporting Hobby Lobby included the National Association of Evangelicals, Azusa Pacific University, the Knights of Columbus, several Catholic theologians, the state of Oklahoma, and many Republican members of Congress.

Parties supporting the HHS included the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce, the Freedom From Religion Foundation, Jewish Social Policy Action Network and many Democratic members of Congress.

A decision by the Supreme Court regarding the Hobby Lobby case is expected to come by this summer and will likely have an effect on the dozens of other suits in lower courts.

 

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