Nuclear Fears Eased with Children ‘Radiation Meters’ in Japan

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    (Photo: Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon)
    Elementary schoolchildren wear protective headgear as they walk to school in Tokyo April 25, 2011. Some schools in Tokyo have asked their students to wear the protective headgear on their way to school and while returning home since March 11's deadly earthquake and tsunami.
By Daniel Blake, Christian Post Contributor
June 14, 2011|8:41 am

More than 34,000 children near the Fukushima nuclear plant will be given radiation meters to help quell fears of the effects of radiation in Japan.

The Fukushima nuclear plant is still on alert following the full meltdown at three of its reacts in the wake of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. However, concerns have grown for thousands of children in Fukushima city, which is located just 37 miles from the plant. The city is outside the 12-mile no-go zone around the nuclear plant, but many residents remain concerned about radiation.

The radiation dosimeters will be given to the children for about three months, with the first wave of handouts scheduled to take place in September. All children aged between four and 15 will wear the devices for the three months, with data collected by authorities on a monthly basis.

The devices will also be distributed to those with children under three years at the request of parents.

According to CNN, Masazo Kikuchi, officer of the city's education board said, “We received the voice from the parents and citizens concerned about radiation exposure of the children. We decided to distribute them for the safety and assurance.”

The announcement comes following large protests on Saturday where protestors called for safer energy sources to be used.

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The protests marked the three-month anniversary since the earthquake and tsunami hit, sparking a nuclear disaster that has forced thousands to desert the region surrounding the Fukushima nuclear plants.

Protestors urged authorities to look at alternatives to nuclear energy, saying that lives were being put at risk by the current reliance on nuclear energy.

Various restrictions have been imposed on agricultural and fisheries products since the disaster, and these have devastated Japanese farmers and fishermen.

Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan is struggling to deal with the aftermath of the massive tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, although he managed to survive a recent vote for no confidence against him.

 

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