CP

Friday, Nov 21, 2014

Tomb Belonging to Philip, Disciple of Christ Found

July 27, 2011|11:36 pm

One of the disciples of Jesus Christ was discovered in Turkey recently, according to a report released by Andalu Agency Wednesday.

The tomb of St. Philip the Apostle, one of the 12 original Disciples of Christ, was recently found in the south-western Turkish province of Denizli, archaeologists have claimed.

After years of searching for St. Philip, archaeologists have claimed to have finally stumbled upon his burial chamber.

Francesco D’Andria, an Italian professor and archaeologist, headed the excavation team that discovered the tomb.

Archaeologists stumbled upon the monument while working to excavate a newly-discovered church in the ancient city of Hierapolis, which is present day Pamukkale.

Hierapolis, or “sacred city”, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site known for its spas and hot springs since the second century.

Philip was reportedly martyred at the location, when he returned from preaching throughout Asia Minor, according to Anadolu Agency. The Agency reported that St. Philip preached in Greece, Syria and Phrygia before dying around 80 A.D.

During this time, St. Philip was believed to have been beheaded and crucified upside down, according to the agency. An octagon shaped tomb was built for the disciple and named “The Martryium.”

"We have been looking for Saint Philip's tomb for years," D'Andria has said. "We finally found it in the ruins of a church which we excavated a month ago."

D’Andria said he is positive that the tomb belongs to the martyr; based on the structure and writings on it. However, the archaeologist said his team had yet to open Philip's tomb.

When questioned about whether the inside of the tomb would ever be investigated, D’Andria seemed confident.

“One day it will be, no doubt," he said.

In the meantime, the professor called the finding "a major development both for archeology and the Christian world.”

Source URL : http://www.christianpost.com/news/jesus-christs-disciple-found-52944/