Muslim Men Urged to Marry Christian Women to Spread Islam in Spain

(Photo: Reuters/Marko Djurica)A migrant who is waiting to cross the Greek-Macedonian border, rests with her children at a makeshift camp near the village of Idomeni, Greece, March 8, 2016.

To strengthen their religion, an unknown group in Spain has put up hundreds of posters in a migrant-dominated area that call on Muslim men to marry Spanish women, including Christians, and then teach them that "Islam is the true religion." 

"It is permissible and encouraged that the Muslim man marries honest and chaste women who belong to the People of the Book. Even though they have distorted and altered the tradition, they are still suitable for marriage," the poster reads, according to Breitbart, which translated the poster's content into English from the original report in the Spanish newspaper La Gaceta.

"Brother, enter a partnership with a Spaniard, teach her that Islam is the true religion," the poster adds. "Islamic law dictates that the fruits of this alliance will follow Islam, which will further strengthen our community."

The posters have appeared in El Raval, a neighborhood in the Ciutat Vella district of Barcelona. The area is infamous for its nightlife, cabarets and crime. About half of its population was born abroad, mostly South America, Pakistan, the Philippines and Romania.

The poster, which denigrates Christians, invites members of the community to an "information meeting" to be held on Tuesday at an Arabic restaurant.

El Raval has been a key target for some Muslim groups who say followers of Islam have a "right of return" to Spain due to that country's Islamic history.

Between 711 and 1492, Islamic Spain, or Al-Andalus, was a multi-cultural mix of Muslims, Christians and Jews, though with restrictions.

Currently, about four percent of Spain's population is Muslim, more than half of which are immigrants. Some jihadist groups have been calling for a re-establishment of Islamic rule in Al-Andalus.

In May 2016, an Amnesty International survey found that 97 percent of Spanish respondents were willing to "personally accept people fleeing war or persecution" into their country.

The group's Refugees Welcome Index measured people's willingness to have refugees live in their countries, towns, neighborhoods or even their own homes. "Spain has one of the most favourable positions towards hosting refugees and asylum-seekers of the countries surveyed," Amnesty said.

Spain's government, however, has been careful and reluctant to take in refugees.

Last month, nearly 500 African migrants crossed the border fence from Morocco into the Spanish enclave of Ceuta, one of two Spanish enclaves in North Africa, according to CNN. In a separate incident, at least 800 African migrants tried to storm a border fence into Ceuta from Morocco on New Year's Day, according to Reuters.