Phil Mickelson Says Taxes Will Bring 'Drastic Changes,' Rumors of Retirement Begin

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  • U.S. golfer Phil Mickelson (R) walks with teammate Keegan Bradley at the 39th Ryder Cup at the Medinah Country Club in Medinah, Illinois, September 29, 2012.
    (Photo: Reuters/Jeff Haynes)
    U.S. golfer Phil Mickelson (R) walks with teammate Keegan Bradley at the 39th Ryder Cup at the Medinah Country Club in Medinah, Illinois, September 29, 2012.
By Myles Collier , Christian Post Contributor
January 21, 2013|9:47 am

Professional golfer Phil Mickelson has revealed that he is planning on making some "drastic changes" to his life, with rumors stating those changes were brought on by higher taxes both at the state and federal level.

"It's been an interesting offseason," Mickelson said during a press conference on Sunday after the final round of the Humana Challenge. "And I'm going to have to make some drastic changes. I'm not going to jump the gun and do it right away, but I will be making some drastic changes."

The 42-year-old golfer said that he would address his comments at the upcoming Farmers Insurance Open, which will be played at Torrey Pines in his hometown of San Diego. some have speculated that he will move out of California and might retire from the game because of new taxes that are going into effect in 2013.

"There are going to be some drastic changes for me because I happen to be in that zone that has been targeted both federally and by the state and, you know, it doesn't work for me right now. So I'm going to have to make some changes," the golfer said.

During the press conference, Mickelson did not highlight any specific actions that had caused him to consider making any changes, but he did highlight the increase in the tax rate on high-income earners that came about in a deal to avoid the so-called "fiscal cliff" that took place in the beginning of the year.

California state taxes are also set to increase after the passage of Proposition 30 last November, which aims to raise money for the state's school system.

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"If you add up all the federal and you look at the disability and the unemployment and the Social Security and the state, my tax rate's 62, 63 percent. So I've got to make some decisions on what I'm going to do," Mickelson added.

 

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