Tim Tebow Reveals Key to Having Unwavering Faith

Joshua S. Kelly-USA TODAY SportsColumbia Fireflies outfielder Tim Tebow (15) watches his hit on a home run during the second inning against the Augusta GreenJackets at Spirit Communications Park, April 6, 2017.

There's a reason that Tim Tebow has not waivered in his faith even though many have doubted the former NFL star's professional baseball pursuits.

According to Augusta, Georgia, news service WFXG, the former Heisman Trophy winning college football champion turned minor league outfielder with the New York Mets' Columbia Fireflies seeks to find understanding when faced with moments that could challenge his faith.

"Faith is also like a muscle — the more you work it, the stronger it will get and the more it will grow. And for me, it's something that I've always tried to do," he said. "And in life, in all the highs and all the lows, you just try to understand why I'm going through it. What can I learn and how can I use it?"

He continued by adding, "How can I use this opportunity, this platform, or this transition, or this negativity — whatever it is — to use it for the better, for someone's better, for God's glory, to somehow make a difference?"

Tebow has spoken about his faith being tested in the past. In a Rolling Stone interview, the University of Florida football champion spoke about dealing with those trials at different points in life.

"Whether you're sitting on the edge of the bed and you're thinking 'there are 32 [NFL] teams and nobody wants me' or 'no one wants me to do what I want to do.' Or you get another opportunity, and you don't make it," Tebow revealed. "I've been cut four times. Well only three, but traded once, so it kind of counts as four."

Tebow released his second book Shaken: Discovering Your True Identity in the Midst of Life's Storms last year with an aim to encourage others whose faith may be wavering.

"Being able to be popular and have the run in Denver and everything in Florida, I am thankful for the platform. But I'm also grateful, not always, but a lot more now, for the lows," he said. "Because people can understand that even more. They can understand what you're going through and relate to it and hopefully that can be an encouragement to anyone who reads it."