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Thursday, July 28, 2011
Amy Winehouse Death, Sources Close to Her Reveal Possiblity of New Album Being Released

Amy Winehouse Death, Sources Close to Her Reveal Possiblity of New Album Being Released

It has been reported that Amy Winehouse has left behind a large collection of unreleased music following her death last week. Fans are demanding a posthumous release of her work, however no decisions have been made on when or how the music would be released, according to a source close to the singer.

Spokesman Chris Goodman made a comment Thursday stating that Winehouse left behind “plenty” of material, but that there have not been any discussions on releasing any of the music.

Winehouse, famous for hit records such as “Rehab” and “You Know I’m No Good,” was found dead in her north London home on Saturday. Winehouse struggled with alcohol and drug addiction for many years which many suspect may be the cause of death, although that has not yet been officially determined.

Winehouse had been recording music sporadically over the last two years in preparation for an album she announced in July 2010. She said at that time she would be releasing an album in the next six months, but the album was never completed.

It is not clear how many tracks were finalized for the project.

The Guardian newspaper quoted an unnamed spokesman from Universal Records, who told the paper that Winehouse had left behind the ‘framework’ of about 12 songs.

Salaam Remi, a producer who worked on both Winehouse’s “Frank” and “Back to Black” albums, told New Yorks Power 105.1 radio station that he was working with Winehouse on songs for her new album before she died. However, he explained that most were not finished, and that her estate had not yet approved the release of them.

“We had a lot of things going, there are recordings, but first things first, I think,” he said. “We’re trying to focus on what’s at hand and what her family wants to do.”

Sales of the recently deceased singers’ material have skyrocketed following her death, proving that any new music would fare well in the charts.

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