El Nino 'Bruce Lee' News Update 2015: To Bring Drastic Weather Changes, Say Researchers

Weather forecasters are warning that the current El Nino, aptly nicknamed Bruce Lee for it's strength, could possibly change weather and go on record as the second strongest El Nino. It certainly seems like it has been developing into a strong force of nature in the past 65 years.

ReutersArgentina Floods due to the El Nino, August 12, 2015

Weathermen are unanimous in saying that this El Nino is gearing up to be a record-setter, because of increasing warmth in the key part of the Pacific in the last three months.

The current El Nino likely will clearly overtake the ones in 1997-1998, 1982-83 and 1972-73, Mike Halper, deputy director of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center, told Fox News.

The El Ninos are a result of the winds shifting and the water in the Pacific Ocean getting warmer than usual. This changes weather worldwide, mostly affecting the U.S. in winter, especially California, bringing heavy rain to the southern and eastern U.S.

Experts say that the El Nino events trigger off changing weather patterns around the globe. They are also suggesting that this one could wreak havoc based on recent satellite measurements.

"We're predicting that this El Nino could be among the strongest El Ninos on record, dating back to 1950," said Halpert.

Surprisingly, studies show that El Ninos tend to actually benefit the U.S. It brings rains to drought stricken areas, resulting in good crop yield. Studies have also shown that Atlantic hurricanes tend to tone down and their ferocity is decreased. Even though California mudslides caused a lot of damage, the U.S. economy gained by nearly $22 billion from the 1997-98 El Nino.

So what should we expect? Drastic weather changes, hurricanes and heavy rain, but maybe the drought might lift from North America, courtesy of the Bruce Lee El Nino.