Google Pulling Youtube From Amazon Fire TV and Echo Show

REUTER/Peter HobsonThe Amazon Echo, a voice-controlled virtual assistant, is seen at its product launch for Britain and Germany in London, Britain, September 14, 2016.

Google and Amazon are taking their very public feud to the next level and their customers are paying the price. The search giant recently pulled the YouTube app Amazon's Fire TV and Echo Show after it was revealed that Amazon was unwilling to sell certain Google products.

Google said in a recent statement that it had to take extreme steps after Amazon's recent delisting of new Nest products and the e-commerce giant's long-running refusal to sell Chromecast or support Google Cast.

"Given this lack of reciprocity, we are no longer supporting YouTube on Echo Show and FireTV," the statement said. "We hope we can reach an agreement to resolve these issues soon."

Amazon quickly responded to the move calling it a "disappointing precedent" on Google's part to selectively block customer access to an open website. They also stated that they are working to resolve their differences as soon as possible.

YouTube being pulled from the Echo Show effective immediately which means owners will no longer be able to watch videos from the site. On the other hand, Fire TV owners will lose out on the popular, essential video streaming app starting Jan. 1, 2018.

The quarrel between the two tech juggernauts began when Google pulled YouTube access from the new Echo Show for "violating terms of service." According to the company, Amazon's implementation of YouTube blocked what Google considered "critical features."

Back in 2015, Amazon pulled all retail listings for Google's Chromecast and Nexus Player smart TV box on its website along with Apple TV. While some Google products remain, it's quite clear that the e-tailer isn't too keen on selling products that directly compete with their own line of smart speakers and smart TV boxes.

In the end though, no matter what stance both companies take, it's their customers who will ultimately pay the price. Youtube is an indispensible part of any home assistant thanks to its wide array of guides, DIY videos, and other helpful content. Seeing it go will definitely be upsetting for most users, even more so when they realize that it's all because of petty competition between two billion-dollar companies.