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Current Page: Politics | Tuesday, June 16, 2015
Hillary Clinton Questions Christian Compassion of Rivals: 'Did They Not Go and Hear the Same Lessons I Did in Sunday School?'

Hillary Clinton Questions Christian Compassion of Rivals: 'Did They Not Go and Hear the Same Lessons I Did in Sunday School?'

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa, United States, June 14, 2015. | (Photo Reuters/Jim Young)

At a rally in Des Moines, Iowa, on Sunday, former secretary of state and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton mostly attacked her Republican rivals' economic policies until the very end, where she began to wonder about the lack of Christian compassion of other politicians.

While Clinton did not specifically call out any candidate or person by name she bewailed the lack of compassion and "mean spiritedness" of others in politics.

"Did they not go and hear the same lessons I did in Sunday school," asked Clinton. "Did they not sing the same hymns?" She continued questioning their morality and Christian theology by wondering, "Did they never hear, 'there but for the grace of God go I?'"

The rally in Des Moines followed Clinton's Saturday reboot of her campaign where she addressed supporters at Roosevelt Island in New York. Some critics said the reboot of her campaign comes on the heels of increasing distance from the media over the last couple of months which has drawn criticism from political pundits.

Clinton said the government must do more to help individuals and families but also called for churches and religious institutions to do more.

"I want us to start looking at each other again as fellow human beings and as fellow Americans," declared Clinton.

"I want us to figure out how through our own families, through our houses of worship, through our businesses, that we reach out to those in need. Let's be smart and compassionate at the same time."

Speaking softer and more pronounced during her closing she asked, "Where did this mean spiritedness come from? We are such a blessed nation."

Clinton spent most of her remarks decrying income inequality and, according to her, the bad economies President Obama and former President Bill Clinton inherited but have fixed.

She conceded for now in terms of the economy, "We're standing again, but were not yet running." Clinton said all "the new voices" in the Republican Party are "singing" the same song of "yesterday."

Clinton not only attacked her Republican rivals for what she called failed "top down economic policies," but also their inability to accept climate change and women's reproductive rights.

"They shame and blame women rather than respect our right to make our own reproductive health decisions," she declared. She lectured Republicans to start listening to "scientists" on climate change and accused them of "turning their back on gay people who love each other."

Clinton found time to joke about herself and her candidacy and future presidency saying, "You won't see my hair turn gray in the White House." In her speech, Clinton admitted to coloring her hair, which drew cheers from the assembled. She added that while she is not the "youngest candidate" in the race, she will be "the youngest woman president in the history of the United States."

Clinton, who is still a member of the United Methodist Church, reportedly earned the admiration and support last month of a pastor in South Carolina for her knowledge of scripture. As First Lady, Clinton and the president regularly attended the theologically liberal Foundry United Methodist Church in Washington, D.C.

In April, The Christian Post published, "6 Interesting Facts About Hillary Clinton's Christian Faith." This is Clinton's second bid for the presidency, having fallen short of Barack Obama for the Democratic Party nomination in 2008.

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