Mark Driscoll Says Gender Fluidity and Neutrality May Lead to Polygamy

(Photo: Mark Driscoll Ministries/Mark Driscoll/Screenshot)Arizona-based Trinity Church Pastor Mark Driscoll addresses the issue of polygamy during a video blog, Scottsdale, Arizona, August 22, 2016.

Controversial Trinity Church Pastor Mark Driscoll believes that polygamy might soon become legalized in America and that gender fluidity and neutrality will likely be the cause.

"My belief is that it is entirely possible, if not probable, that you will see polygamy legalized in our lifetime as you now have people who are more gender fluid — they're not ascribing to one particular gender or sexuality," the pastor tells viewers of his video blog posted on Monday.

Driscoll asks, "What is our definition of marriage culturally? It doesn't seem like we have one, and the result is it's open for discussion and debate. ... The argument will be made that this [polygamy] allows people to express the fullness of their gender identity and their sexual orientation and preferences. Some will also argue it will reduce the number of divorces … it will help stabilize the family … "

In his response to a male viewer who wrote in about the topic, the Trinity Church pastor says, "I'll just tell you from a dad's perspective ... I would want you to love my daughter and not pick up any additional wives."

When it comes to the Bible, Driscoll says he doesn't believe that polygamy is wise, godly or a part of God's oringinal intent or design.

"Like many things, when sin enters the world, there's lots of things that happen that shouldn't happen and God is gracious to work through them and/or in spite of those things."

Driscoll refers to Genesis 4 as the first example of polygamy where Lamech, a descendant of Cain, had two wives, Adah and Zillah.

The pastor says, "Lamech was a godless, ungodly guy who did a bad thing, and we see in Genesis 4 that it [polygamy] didn't go well and it wasn't part of God's original intention and design."

"When God made us male and female, he made one man, Adam, he made one woman, Eve. He brought them together to be married. ... There was no possibility of polygamy because there were only two people — one man, one woman ... "

Lamech was said to have entered into a secret pact with Satan (as had Cain before him). When one of Lamech's descendant's shared his secret, Lamech murdered him. Lamech's wives then spread news of the murder, leading Lamech to be cast out of society.

Driscoll, whose church is based in Scottsdale, Arizona, added that "some years ago" LDS members were allegedly "pushed" out of Utah and resettled in nearby Mesa, Arizona — not too far from Scottsdale.

"In some communities not far from the greater Phoenix area there still is the practice of polygamy. It's not always incredibly high profile and public — sometimes it's a little more concealed and private — but it is an issue here among those who are more fundamental in their LDS history and leanings."

Driscoll also refers to television shows that feature polygamist families, which he says are "introducing this kind of ideology and lifestyle to mainstream culture."

One such show the pastor might be referring to is TLC network's "Sister Wives," which focuses on a Nevada man's four wives and their 18 children. According to a report from Fox13, the family is currently in litigation against Utah's ban on plural marriage.

There's also A&E's "Escaping Polygamy," which takes a behind-the-scenes look at the controversial lifestyle — though it doesn't always present it in a positive light.

HBO's 2006 hit "Big Love," which is no longer on the air, is another show that focused on polygamy.

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