President Donald Trump Criticizes FBI Over Russia Controversy; Director Defends Their Name

Reuters/Yuri GripasPresident Donald Trump attacks the FBI on social media.

President Donald J. Trump called out the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for investigating the links between his presidential campaign last year to the Russians.

The President of the United States (POTUS) took to Twitter his criticism of the FBI, saying, "After years of Comey, with the phony and dishonest Clinton investigation (and more), running the FBI, its reputation is in Tatters - worst in History! But fear not, we will bring it back to greatness."

One of the reasons why President Trump criticized the bureau is because they were pressing his former national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn, for information about his campaign's communication with Russia.

However, Flynn already pleaded guilty that he gave the FBI false statements, and the U.S. president himself fired him for doing so.

Critics believe that President Trump obstructed justice since he admitted knowledge that Flynn lied to the FBI by pushing them to drop the investigations against his former national security adviser.

But John Dowd, Trump's lawyer, claims that the U.S. president cannot commit obstruction of justice because "he is the chief law enforcement officer" under the Constitution, Axios reports. This gives President Trump the right to express his side in any case, added Dowd.

Meanwhile, as a response to the U.S. President's attack on social media, FBI director Christopher A. Wray sent out a letter to all 35,000 agents and support staff of the bureau to defend them from harsh words spoken against them.

Wray said in the letter that he was "inspired by example after example of professionalism and dedication to justice demonstrated around the bureau," The New York Times reports.

"It is truly an honor to represent you," Wray added.

Wray encouraged his employees to lend a deaf ear to the criticisms against them, and instead keep their focus on their "critical mission."