3 Words That Could Change Donald Trump's Life

The views expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the editorial opinion of The Christian Post or its editors.
Expand | Collapse
Michael Brown holds a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages and Literatures from New York University and has served as a professor at a number of seminaries. He is the author of 25 books and hosts the nationally syndicated, daily talk radio show, the Line of Fire.

Since my open letter to Donald Trump on August 27th, 2015, I've raised many concerns about his candidacy, feeling strongly that there were other Republican candidates who were far more qualified for the job.

And I urged voters to consider these other candidates, warning that Donald Trump could turn out to be a National Enquirer candidate for a Jerry Springer generation, a vulgar and mean-spirited reality TV star who would stop at nothing to be elected.

But now that he's the presumptive Republican nominee and his only real competition looks to be Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders, candidates I couldn't possibly vote for because of their staunchly pro-abortion, pro-LGBT activist positions (among other things), I want to offer Mr. Trump some words of wisdom — words that could radically change his life if he would only take heed.

Last August, in my open letter, I wrote, "my heartfelt suggestion to you, sir, is that you humble yourself before your Creator, that you recognize your sins and shortcomings, asking Him for forgiveness through the cross, and that you ask Him to help you to be the kind of man that America (and the nations) need at this critical time in world history.

"It's a painful process, but it's a glorious process, and if you take my friendly advice, you'll never look back with regret.

"So, what will it be? Donald Trump, the self-made billionaire who fell short of his goal, or the new Donald Trump, ready to change the nation?"

Since that time, a number of Christian leaders have met with Trump, sharing the gospel plainly with him and encouraging him to moderate his tone and watch his words, but to date, without much outward success.

Yet that doesn't mean that we don't keep trying (and praying), so, with that in mind, I want to suggest that Donald Trump learn to say (and mean!) these three simple words: I WAS WRONG.

It takes a strong, confident man to admit to his failures.

It takes a secure, mature man to acknowledge that he messed up.

The weak, the insecure, the immature, those lacking confidence, they are the ones who point the finger at others, who make excuses, who play the blame game, who deny personal guilt.

Those who are honest have no problem saying, "I was wrong. I blew it. Please forgive me."

Those are liberating words!

As the Bible says, "God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble" (James 4:6).

And other people give grace to the humble as well — to those willing to shoulder the blame for what they did; to those who show true contrition; to those who make a change.

Americans in particular are forgiving people, and many of us would think a lot more highly of candidate Trump if he plainly said, "Look, I've been foolish and full of myself, and I now regret my words and actions."

Many Americans who have been turned off by his rude and crude ways would reconsider his candidacy if he said, "I WAS WRONG when I insulted Megyn Kelly and Heidi Cruz and other women. I WAS WRONG when I built that strip-club casino. I WAS WRONG when I destroyed my first marriage with adultery. With God's help, I intend to put the past behind me, learn from my mistakes, and lead America into a much brighter future."

That's the kind of leader America needs, one who finds strength in humility and power in honesty.

If Mr. Trump would learn the secret of getting low, he could still be a decisive, fearless, even visionary leader, but he'd do it with the wind at his back.

Otherwise, if he hardens his heart in pride, he could find God Himself resisting him.

Worse still, he could even be headed for a fall.

So, let's pray that Donald Trump will discover the life-changing power of saying I WAS WRONG. And if you're close to him and you read this article, please pass it on to him.

(For this article in illustrated video form, go here.)

Dr. Michael Brown (www.askdrbrown.org) is the host of the nationally syndicated Line of Fire radio program. His latest book is The Grace Controversy. Connect with him on Facebook or Twitter.