Ben Carson Calls America's Relationship With Faith 'Schizophrenia;' Tells Megachurch He's Ready for War With 'PC Police'

(Photo: REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)U.S. Republican candidate Dr. Ben Carson speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, October 9, 2015.

GOP Presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson vowed to wage a war on what he called "PC police" before the Free Chapel megachurch in Gainesville, Georgia, on Sunday morning. He also described America's relationship with faith as "schizophrenia," noting that faith-positive messages are displayed on U.S. currency, yet there is an aversion to talk about religion.

"The pledge of allegiance to our flag says we are one nation under God. Many courtrooms in the land, on the wall it says 'In God We Trust.' Every coin in our pocket, every bill in our wallet says 'In God We Trust,'" Carson told the thousands who came to listen to his speech at the megachurch, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

"So if it's in our founding documents, it's in our pledges, in our courts and it's on our money, but we're not supposed to talk about it, what in the world is that? In medicine it's called schizophrenia. And I, for one, am simply not willing to kick God to the curb."

Carson took time to sign copies of his book, A More Perfect Union, and said that people have been asking him why he is entering the political fray after a successful career as a neurosurgeon.

"Well, I'll tell you why: it's because America is worth saving. If that means getting into a war with the PC police, I'm ready to fight that war. And I hope you will join me," the GOP candidate said.

Carson has been outspoken on a number of wide-ranging issues in recent weeks, and on CBS' "Face the nation" on Sunday defended previous comments that suggested the Holocaust in World War II could have been prevented if Jewish people were armed with guns.

"Whether it's on our doorstep or whether it's 50 years away, it's still a concern and it's something that we must guard against. That's one of the real purposes of having a constitution. I think the founders were really quite insightful into looking at possibilities and understanding what has happened in other places and trying to put together something that would prevent that from happening here," Carson said.

The retired neurosurgeon attracted controversy last week for comments he made about the Oregon shooting massacre, when he suggested he would have done more than the other students, had he been at the scene of the crime.

"I would not just stand there and let him shoot me," Carson said on "Fox & Friends," talking about the Umpqua Community College rampage that led to the deaths of 10 people.

"I would say, 'Hey, guys, everybody attack him. He may shoot me, but he can't get us all.'"

President Barack Obama and other Democrats have blamed America's gun laws on creating the environment for such shooting sprees, and suggested that stricter gun regulation is needed in the country.

"There is a gun for roughly every man, woman, and child in America. So how can you, with a straight face, make the argument that more guns will make us safer?" Obama asked in a speech following the tragedy.

Earlier in October, a University of Pennsylvania religious-studies professor said that Carson deserves the "coon of the year award."

Anthea Butler, a frequent MSNBC guest, made the controversial comment in a Twitter post, which has since been deleted, Breitbart News reported.