Brazilian Judge Rules in Favor of Evangelical Psychologist Offering Reparative Therapy to Homosexuals

(Photo: REUTERS/Nacho Doce)Members of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community, that have been invited to live in a building that the roofless movement has occupied, spend time in the building, in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 3, 2016.

A Brazilian judge ruled last week in favor of an evangelical Christian psychologist who offers what critics call "conversion therapy" for homosexuals.

According to the Associated Press, Judge Waldemar Claudio de Carvalho ruled that homosexuality could be treated with sexual orientation conversion therapies.

The case concerns evangelical Christian psychologist Rozangela Justino, whose license was revoked in 2016 after she offered the therapy in question, The Guardian reported.

Justino told a local newspaper back in 2009 that homosexuality is a "disease," explaining that religious guidance can help.

"I feel directed by God to help people who are homosexual," she said at the time.

The Federal Council of Psychology had banned psychologists from treating homosexuality as a disease in a 1999 resolution, and has said that it would appeal the recent injunction.

LGBT groups, such as the National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Alliance, said that they would appeal at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

Brazilian celebrities and scores of LGBT activists also strongly criticized the judge's ruling, The Guardian noted.

Gay therapy, especially when it comes to minors, has faced numerous legal challenges in the United States as well, and has been banned in several states.

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected in May an appeal attempting to strike down California's ban on sexual orientation change efforts or reparative therapy for minors.

California's Senate Bill 1172 was passed in 2012.

It was unsuccessfully challenged by Donald Welch, an ordained minister and licensed family therapist at Skyline Wesleyan Church, an evangelical Christian church in San Diego, along with a Roman Catholic psychiatrist who himself underwent such therapy and now wants to perform it on others.

The ethics of reparative therapy have been scrutinized by some Christian denominations. The Church of England urged the U.K. government in July to ban the practice.

"Conversion therapy is harmful, dangerous and just doesn't work," said Jayne Ozanne, who represents laity in the Diocese of Oxford, at the time. "People may be able to alter their behavior but they can never alter their innate desire."

Christopher Doyle, an ex-gay therapist who uses Sexual Orientation Change Efforts with his patients, previously told The Christian Post that such therapy can be helpful, however.

"No child should be denied the right to get the therapy that fits their values, and no parent or family should be told they must accept that their child is gay or transgender if they believe their son or daughter has underlying trauma that may be causing these unwanted feelings," Doyle stated.

Doyle further argued that U.S. bills banning such therapy are the result of "political correctness gone wild at the hands of liberal politicians and gay activists."

Follow Stoyan Zaimov on Facebook: CPSZaimov