Chicken Wing Shortage Hits Super Bowl Fans: Where's the Beef?

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    (PHOTO:REUTERS/Tim Shaffer)
    Reigning Wing Bowl champion Joey Chestnut eats chicken wings during the 16th annual Wing Bowl event in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 1, 2008. Chestnut from San Jose, California ate 241 chicken wings to retain the crown.
By Brittney R. Villalva, Christian Post Reporter
January 23, 2013|3:08 pm

Chicken wings could become a delicacy this year around Super Bowl time. Reports have confirmed a lack of chicken across the nation.

An annual report done by the National Chicken Council has revealed that farmers produced approximately 1 percent fewer birds last year. The low production is a result of raising corn and feed prices. It also translates into higher costs of chicken at the grocery store.

The Super Bowl is one of the highest food consumption days of the year, second only to Thanksgiving. On game day over 1.23 billion wings will be devoured, creating an above average demand. The average price for chicken wings in the Northeast was up to $2.11 a pound- an increase of 22 percent, according to the Business News Daily.

The shortage will most likely not affect consumers who plan on eating out while watching the game, says Bill Roenigk, chief economist for the chicken council.

"The good news for consumers is that restaurants plan well in advance to ensure they have plenty of wings for the big game," he told The Chicago Tribune. "And some restaurants are promoting boneless wings and some are offering flexible serving sizes."

Fans who plan to watch the game from home will be advised to plan ahead as well. Grocery stores are also more likely to put chicken wings on sale weeks before the big game. Hours before the game may be too late.

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"If you're planning to cook your own wings, I wouldn't advise being in line at the supermarket two hours before kickoff," Roenigk said.

The idea of serving wings at bars on game day originally began as a tactic to sell relatively cheap food while encouraging customers to drink more beer. If trends continue, however, bar owners may be left asking, "Where's the beef?"

 

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