Christian Coalition Denies Saying Johnny Depp Will 'Burn in Hell' for Jesus Song

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  • Johnny Depp
    (Photo: REUTERS / Jean-Paul Pelissier)
    Cast member Johnny Depp poses as he arrives on the red carpet for the screening of the film "Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" at the 64th Cannes Film Festival, May 14, 2011.
By Stoyan Zaimov, Christian Post Reporter
December 9, 2011|7:57 pm

Johnny Depp's "Jesus Stag Night Club" song has caused a great deal of debate over its content, but some extreme remarks said to be from a Christian group posted on various news sites have turned out to be false.

The song describes a Jesus-like figure who gets drunk and finds himself in a night of trouble stumbling through bars and clubs. Depp sings the lyrics to the son, which was created by Babybird, a British Indie band.

The song has become popular and has been spreading across radio waves, but it has also attracted a good deal of controversy. Some Christians are calling the song distasteful, while others see it as a good-humored tune by the "Pirates of the Caribbean" star. Hundreds of YouTube commenters have gone back and forth on the issue under the various videos for the song.

A number of Christian organizations have also come out with statements on the song, but some of the extreme reactions that have been reported by various sources have proven to be greatly exaggerated.

One comment reported by the Daily Star reported that The Christian Coalition of America, which was founded by television evangelist and former Baptist minister Pat Robertson, had said that "One day, Johnny Depp and his cronies will face the judgment of our Lord and they will burn in hell for this filth."

The remark was attributed to "Lee Douglas," who was said to be a spokesman for the organization, but The Christian Post investigated the claim and found that there is no such person at the Christian Coalition of America, and that the group has been "actively searching" to discover Douglas' identity.

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Michelle Combs, a spokeswoman for the organization, said that although the coalition would describe the song as "inappropriate" due to its timing with the Christmas season, the group is not against free speech and had not made such inflammatory comments as suggested.

 

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