11 Things I Learned from Pastors' Wives

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  • Thom Rainer
By Thom S. Rainer, Christian Post Contributor
January 30, 2014|11:28 am

Several months ago, I wrote a post about pastors' wives.  The responses and comments were numerous and incredible. One of the greatest blessings about this blog for me is how much I learn from others. As I read the comments and the interactions, I came away with a greater appreciation for pastors' wives, as well as a greater concern for these ladies.

I have attempted to summarize the primary issues the pastors' wives discussed. I am sure I've missed something. For now, here are eleven things I learned from pastors' wives.

1. The number one challenge for pastors' wives is loneliness. That issue arose again and again. Many of these ladies have no true confidants. Some have scars from bad relationships. More than a few have experienced depression. Some still are.

2. These ladies need to know they have the love and support of their husbands. Some frankly feel that their husbands have a mistress – the local congregation he serves. A pastor's wife can endure much if she knows of her husband's unwavering and repeatedly articulated love.

3. A pastor's wife does not want a church member to tell her what her "job" at the church is. She would rather serve the church according to her gifts and calling, not according to some false sense of expectations.

4. She would like church members to understand that neither she nor her family is perfect. Allow her to make mistakes. Let her children be "normal" children. Don't call out family members every time one of them does not quite reach perfection.

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5. The pastor's wife does not want to field complaints from church members about her husband. She is not a conduit or a complaint desk. She loves her husband, and it breaks her heart to hear negative things about him.

6. The pastors' wives who entered ministry with no forewarning about the issues they would face were the ones who stressed the most. It's not only the issues themselves, it's the surprise factor they often bring. Many of these pastors' wives had no idea what some members would say, what some expectations would be, or how much the glass house syndrome is a hard reality.

7. She does not want to be told she needs to work to support her husband and family. If she chooses to do so, that is fine. But she does not want church members paying her husband minimally with the expectation that she will make up the shortfall in income.

8. While most pastors' wives affirm their identity as a wife in ministry, they do not want that to be their only identity. Many of these women spoke about their ministry, work, and gifts well beyond that of a pastor's wife. They would like to feel free to express their own identities.

9. Many pastors' wives believe they need training for their roles. They have been both surprised and ill prepared for the issues that came their way. They needed either formal training or an informal mentorship to face all the challenges that are common with a pastor's wife.

10. These ladies want to be reminded again and again to keep their focus on Christ. Of course, this reminder is something we all need. But as one pastor's wife expressed, only by remembering what Christ did for her could she face the challenges of her role.

11. Many pastors' wives want a means where they can support one another. Some of them longed for a mentor or someone they could mentor. Others said they would like a forum like my blog where they can share with each other without the fear of reprisal. I wonder if I can do something with the resources I have available to make this request a reality. Let me know.

Dr. Thom Rainer is president and CEO of LifeWay Christian Resources of the Southern Baptist Convention.
 

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