Poll: Most Americans Ring in New Year's with Prayer

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By Elena Garcia, Christian Post Reporter
December 29, 2010|6:10 pm

Before the clock strikes midnight on Friday, Americans will look to the heavens before they look forward to a brand new year.

A new Rasmussen Reports found that a majority of Americans don’t plan on skipping prayer even though they won’t attend parties this New Year's Eve.

An estimated 66 percent say they will say a prayer before the start of 2011, with men more likely than women to do so. Black Americans are also more likely than whites to pray in the last hours of 2010.

About the same proportion of Americans, 64 percent, say they don’t plan on attending a New Year's party, while only 21 percent say they will. Fifteen percent say they cannot predict whether they will attend a party to celebrate the new year or not.

As for when the clock actually strikes midnight, 69 percent of Americans intend to be at home, seven percent will be at a friend's house, and five percent will be at a restaurant or bar. Others surveyed said they will be somewhere else, nine percent, or aren't sure where they will be, ten percent.

More people said they will not be drinking, 48 percent, than say they plan to consume alcohol on New Year’s Eve, 42 percent.

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In an effort to provide family-friendly alternatives, many churches will be offering parties, concerts, and activities on New Year’s Eve.

Phoenix First Assembly in Arizona will host an all-night celebration for its youth that includes a movie, games, and breakfast. Young adults enjoy their own event while married couples can dress up for a New Year's Eve Ball.

A lot of worship houses – like The Potter's House, headed by Bishop T.D. Jakes – will observe New Year's Eve the traditional way, with church services. The nondenominational church will provide services at its Dallas, North Dallas, and Fort Worth locations, and live broadcast for online viewers.

Meanwhile, Mars Hill Church, based in the greater Seattle area, is opting for a more fellowship-style celebration with a New Year's Eve Bowling night.

"We'll knock over pins and kneel in thanks to our gracious God for the year He has given us and waiting enthusiastically for the year that lies ahead," the event organizers wrote on the church's website.

The Rasmussen Reports result are based on a survey of 1,000 adults nationwide conducted on Dec. 26-27, 2010.

 

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