CP Opinion

Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014

Racial Justice and the Godness of God

July 17, 2013|10:04 am

On a wall in my study hangs one of my favorite pictures. It's a photograph of a line of civil rights workers-in the heat of the Jim Crow era. They're standing shoulder-to-shoulder, all of them bearing a sandwich-board-type sign. The sign reads, simply: "I Am a Man."

I love that picture because it sums up precisely the issue at that time, and at every time. The struggle for civil rights for African-Americans in this country wasn't simply a "political" question. It wasn't merely the question of, as Martin Luther King Jr. puts it from before the Lincoln Memorial, the unfulfilled promises of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution (although it was nothing less than that). At its root, Jim Crow (and the spirit of Jim Crow, still alive and sinister) is about theology. It's about the question of the "Godness" of God and the humanness of humanity.

White supremacy was, like all iniquity from the Garden insurrection on, cruelly cunning. Those with power were able to keep certain questions from being asked by keeping poor and working-class white people sure that they were superior to someone: to the descendants of the slaves around them. The idea of the special dignity of the white "race" gave something of a feeling of aristocracy to those who were otherwise far from privilege, while fueling the fallen human passions of wrath, jealousy, and pride.

In so doing, Jim Crow repeated the old strategies of the reptilian powers of the air: to convince human beings simultaneously and paradoxically that they are gods and animals. In the Garden, after all, the snake approached God's image-bearer, directing her as though he had dominion over her (when it was, in fact, the other way around). He treated her as an animal, and she didn't even see it. At the same time, the old dragon appealed to her to transcend the limits of her dignity. If she would reach for the forbidden, she would be "like God, knowing good and evil." He suggested that she was more than a human; she was a goddess.

That's why the words "I Am a Man" were more than a political slogan. They were a theological manifesto. Those bravely wearing those signs were declaring that they'd decided not to believe the rhetoric used against them. They refused to believe the propaganda that they were a "lesser race," or even just a different race. They refused to believe the propaganda (sometimes propped up by twisted Bible verses) that they and their ancestors were bestial, animal-like, unworthy of personhood.

The words affirmed the thing that frightened the racist establishment more than anything. Those behind the signs were indeed persons. They bore a dignity that could not be extinguished by custom or legislation. I am a man.

The words also implied a fiery rebuke. The white supremacists believed they could deny human dignity to those they deemed lesser. They had no right to do so. They believed themselves to be gods and not creatures, able to decree whatever they willed with no thought to natural rights, or to nature's God. The signs pointed out what that those who made unjust laws, and who unleashed the water-hoses and pit-bull dogs, were only human, and, as such, would face judgment.

The civil rights movement succeeded not simply because the arc of history bends toward justice but because, embedded in our common humanity, we know that Someone is bending it toward a Judgment Seat.

"I Am a Man," the sign said, with all the dignity that truth carries with it. And, the sign implied, "You Are Just a Man." If that's so, then, as Odetta would sing, "God's Gonna Cut You Down." The truth there is deeper than the struggles of the last couple of centuries. It gets to the root problem of fallen human existence, and it's the reason white supremacy was of the spirit of Antichrist.

Behind the horror of Jim Crow is the horror of satanized humanity, always kicking against its own creatureliness, always challenging the right of God to be God. However often this spirit emerges, with all its pride and brutality, the Word of God still stands: "You are but a man, and no god" (Ezek. 28:2).

The gospel that reconciles the sons of slaveholders with the sons of slaves is the same gospel that reconciled the sons of Amalek with the sons of Abraham. It is a gospel that reclaims the dignity of humanity and the lordship of God. It is a gospel that presents us with a brother who puts the lie to any claim to racial superiority as he takes on the glory and limits of our common humanity in Adam. Jim Crow is put to flight ultimately because Jesus Christ steps forward out of history and announces, with us, "I Am a Man."

A version of this article originally ran on January 17, 2011.

Russell D. Moore is president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission.
Source URL : http://www.christianpost.com/news/racial-justice-and-the-godness-of-god-100272/