iOS 12 Rumors: FaceTime Animoji, Deeper Siri Integration, and More

Reuters/ISSEI KATOA man looks at Apple's new iPhone 8 (L) and his iPhone 7 at the Apple Store in Tokyo's Omotesando shopping district/

After the release of the iOS 11 was plagued by performance issues, it was revealed that Apple is looking to make reliability the primary focus of the iOS 12. Now, the Cupertino giant is also looking to integrate Animoji in FaceTime as well as deeper Siri integration.

According to Bloomberg, Apple will be bringing its Animoji characters to FaceTime allowing iOS users to put virtual emoji over their faces similar to the filters found in Snapchat, Facebook, and Instagram. This is just one of the many features set to arrive on the company's new iOS release codenamed "Peace."

Other features include deeper Siri integration with in the iPhone's search view, Do Not Disturb improvements that will give users more options to automatically reject phone calls or silence notifications, version of its Stocks app, and a multiplayer mode for augmented reality games.

iOS 12 will also reportedly include universal apps that work across iPhones, iPads, and Macs, similar to what Microsoft did with Windows Universal Apps. While the mechanics are still to be announced, developers will be able to design a single third-party app that works using a touchscreen, a mouse, or a trackpad, depending on whether it's running on an iPhone, iPad, or Mac.

It is currently unknown if Apple will release a new SDK with new APIs to provide the required infrastructure for cross platform play. Right now the UIKit and AppKit softwares provide required infrastructure for iOS and macOS app user interfaces respectively, with neither capable of doing both.

All these features can be expected with the iOS 12, which is expected to be unveiled alongside macOS 10.14 at the WWDC 2018 in June.

Apple is definitely promising a lot with its upcoming software update. Hopefully they will be able to spread out its feature updates into steady point releases to allow adequate time for testing in order to prevent the same fallout experienced during the iOS 11 release.