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Pornhub’s teen sex ed course

Pornhub’s teen sex ed course

While the pandemic has kept many of America’s students out of school and away from the hugely offensive comprehensive sex education classes that are a concern to many parents, Pornhub has provided their own online sex education course. Any teen with a smartphone is well aware of Pornhub — even if they haven’t personally accessed it. The new “educational” series on Pornhub’s Sexual Wellness Center could perhaps lure them in.

Pornhub says it is aiming to provide access to information and advice about sexuality, sexual health, and relationships. It’s all free — but the curiosity of a new young audience will undoubtedly result in the porn content they will be willing to pay for later. Pornhub appears to be capitalizing on the COVID-19 pandemic, with more teens on their screens— and offering “clean” content under the guise of sex education.

It’s challenging enough to monitor teens and their cyber habits. With Pornhub offering sex education and advice, vulnerable and gullible youth will find it easier to return to the website for the explicit content offered.

It’s ironic that a company profiting from the abuse and exploitation of men, women, and children — that are viewed as nothing more than sexual objects, is also teaching our kids about sex and relationships.

According to Fight The New Drug porn triggers a release of dopamine in the reward center of the brain. So, what might be a mild dose of porn in sex education material will begin that “feel good” sensation that a shot of dopamine provides.

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With the amount of free porn in the cyber world, one could wonder why anyone would visit a pay-per-view website. This is where our brains go from “liking” something to “wanting” something. The liking center is a small part of the reward center of the brain. It gives enjoyable feelings — like you might get from winning a game. But this area also lights up for addictive things too — that feel enjoyable at first.

What happens next is that the “liking center” gets too much stimulation and the pleasure response goes numb. It takes more and more of the stimulus to reach that dopamine high. Porn does this. It takes more images, more graphic content, and more often.

The larger area of the brain’s reward center is the “wanting” system. The brain can rewire itself in response to intense pleasure — so those experiences can be remembered and repeated. The more often that experience is repeated, the stronger those nerve connections become. Porn use escalates because tolerance is reached — boredom ensues, and more hardcore porn is required. Eventually, what may have started out as viewing mild porn morphs into viewing violent, aggressive pornographic scenes.

Learning about porn addiction should be part of the same health course that students take about drug or alcohol abuse. But we can guarantee these lessons won’t be part of Pornhub’s sex education course.

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Karen Farris saw the need to help underserved kids while serving in a youth ministry that gave her the opportunity to visit rural schools on the Olympic Peninsula. She now volunteers her time grant writing to bring resources to kids in need. She also shares stories of faith in action for those needing a dose of hope on her weekly blog, Friday Tidings.www.fridaytidings.com

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