Does Museum of the Bible Ignore, Treat Jesus as 'Afterthought'? VP Responds

(Photo: Museum of the Bible)Guests at Museum of the Bible have the chance to journey through time, technology and culture to learn about the history of the Bible and the translation process. 

The Museum of the Bible, which is set for its official opening in Washington D.C. in November, has responded to several news headlines claiming that its multitech exhibits largely ignore the story of Jesus Christ.

"The forthcoming Museum of the Bible is nonsectarian and invites everyone to engage with the history, narrative and impact of the best-selling book of all time," Steven Bickley, Museum of the Bible's vice president of marketing, administration and finance, told The Christian Post in an email Thursday.

"It's no surprise a museum about the world's most controversial book would inspire passionate conversations even before it is complete, which is why we invite the world to see Museum of the Bible for themselves when it opens to the public Nov. 18, 2017."

Some media outlets, such as The Washington Post, that previewed the various exhibits and technology the museum will have on show, argued that though the $500 million project includes tens of thousands of Biblical texts and artifacts, it is light on the Gospel of Christ.

"D.C.'s huge new Museum of the Bible includes lots of tech — but not a lot of Jesus," WP's headline on Monday read, adding that there is "very little Jesus" present in the exhibits.

The Daily Mail reported that the museum "features lots of technology but ignores the story of Jesus' crucifixion and resurrection."

And Newsmax said that Jesus is "nearly an afterthought in Museum of the Bible."

Bickley explained to CP that the Narrative floor of the museum is divided in half between the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.

"An intriguing element awaiting guests on this floor is 'The World of Jesus of Nazareth,' featuring the sights and sounds of Jesus' day, as well as a film — produced in a stylized, ink-and-parchment motif — focused on the spread of the early church, as told from the perspective of those who knew Jesus," he continued.

The story of the early Christians and how their community, centered on Jesus, originated and spread will be presented, he noted.

(Photo: Museum of the Bible)Museum of the Bible's 472-seat World Stage Theater features cutting-edge, 360-degree projection mapping and leverage 17 state-of-the-art 4K projectors to turn the entire venue into a stunning and dynamic digital canvas.

"As the film unfolds, guests will hear the New Testament story of a new community of both Jews and Gentiles whose growth was fueled by a belief that God is leading people home through Jesus, whom they believed God raised from the dead to rule as king. Throughout the 430,000-square-foot building are quotes by and about Jesus and images of Jesus, as he is a key figure in the Bible," Bickley described. 

"Everyone is welcome to draw their own conclusions when they enter the finished museum in just a few weeks."

The long-awaited project hosts arguably the largest private collection of ancient Biblical texts and artifacts, collected primarily by Steve Green, president of Hobby Lobby and chairman of the museum's board.

Portions of the museum's collections have traveled around the world, including multiple cities in the U.S. as well as countries like Israel, Cuba, Argentina, Germany, and Vatican City, reaching more than half a million people to date.

General admission to the museum will be free, with suggested donations of $15.