Iraqi Housewife Says She 'Beheaded, Cooked Heads' of ISIS Fighters

Screenshot/CNN39-year-old Wahida Mohamed, also known as Um Hanadi and who identifies herself as a housewife, says she has been fighting terrorists in Iraq for several years.

A 39-year-old housewife in Iraq, who leads a tribal militia and has been fighting Islamic State for years, says in a media interview that she has beheaded fighters from the terror group, cooked their heads and posted the pictures on her Facebook page.

"I fought them. I beheaded them. I cooked their heads, I burned their bodies," Wahida Mohamed, also known as Um Hanadi and who carries a Beretta 9-millimeter pistol with her, tells CNN. "This is all documented. You can see it on my Facebook page," adds Hanadi, who leads a force of around 70 men in the area of Sharqat in Salah al-Din province, a town 50 miles south of Mosul.

The mother of two daughters says she started fighting terrorists in 2004, working with government and coalition forces. She has received death threats from Islamic State, also known as ISIS, ISIL or Daesh. "But I refused. I'm at the top of their most wanted list even more than the prime minister," she says, adding that terrorists killed her first and second husbands, her father and three brothers.

Terrorists also tried to assassinate Hanadi at least six times, she says. "I have shrapnel in my head and legs, and my ribs were broken."

Last month, local residents in the Sharqat district stormed a prison run by IS, killed five prison guards and freed at least 40 prisoners, even as Iraqi forces regained the district from the terror group with the help of the U.S.-led international coalition.

The incident took place around the time when security forces expelled IS from the Sharqat district, where more than 160,000 people had been displaced due to IS violence.

Hundreds of IS militants were killed in the fight.

The Sunni terror group wants to create a caliphate in the Levant region and beyond, and controls parts of the territories of Iraq, Syria and Libya. Religious minorities are among its main targets, and its militants use extremely brutal means to punish those who oppose it or refuse to comply with its demands, including its own men.

While the terror group is losing territory in Iraq and Syria, it still has 18,000 to 22,000 fighters there despite more than 13,000 airstrikes by the international coalition led by the United States, according to CIA director John Brennan.