Ken Ham Rejects Latest NASA Claims That Alien-Life Discovery Is Decades Away, Argues Bible Suggests Aliens Do Not Exist

(Photo: Catholic News Service video screencap)Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno, the new president of the Vatican Observatory Foundation, discusses possibility of alien life forms in video published Sept. 19, 2014.

Creation Museum CEO and President Ken Ham has spoken out against media buzz over NASA's chief scientist Ellen Stofan's claims that the discovery of alien life is only decades away. Ham argued that the search for alien life is a secularist objective, and said that the Bible suggests that life outside of Earth does not exist.

"Evolutionists are convinced they'll find life in outer space because if evolution occurred here on Earth, then it must have occurred somewhere else. According to secularists, Earth is not special," Ham wrote on his Answers in Genesis blog.

"In their view, it's just one of many places where, over the supposed billions of years of the universe's history, life managed to come from non-life and begin the process of evolution. Despite a lack of evidence, scientists are becoming increasingly convinced that life will be found soon."

He argued, however, that from a biblical perspective, people "shouldn't expect to find life in outer space."

"Now, we are not told in Scripture if there is no life on other planets or moons. But it certainly seems like there is not. Life did not evolve on Earth or anywhere else but was specially created by our Creator as Genesis clearly tells us," Ham added.

Back in April, Stofan put forth the notion that signs of alien life may be discovered by 2025.

"I think we're going to have strong indications of life beyond Earth within a decade, and I think we're going to have definitive evidence within 20 to 30 years," Stofan said at a panel discussion.

"We know where to look. We know how to look," the NASA scientist added. "In most cases we have the technology, and we're on a path to implementing it. And so I think we're definitely on the road."

Other NASA members, such as former astronaut John Grunsfeld, have agreed that technology is moving closer to being able to find alien life.

"I think we're one generation away in our solar system, whether it's on an icy moon or on Mars, and one generation [away] on a planet around a nearby star," Grunsfeld said, according to Space.com.

Ham reminded readers, however, that "it is to Earth that God Himself came down in the person of Jesus Christ to dwell among men and die and rise again for our salvation. Christ did not come and die for Martians or other extraterrestrials — He came as the 'God-man' to die for mankind, descendants of Adam and Eve."

The Creation Museum President added: "So we have good reason to say that there isn't intelligent extraterrestrial life, and it's doubtful that there is even microbial life in outer space, though Scripture doesn't completely rule out the possibility."

Ham has spoken out against NASA's search for extraterrestrial life in the past, and in July 22 suggested that such a search is driven by "man's rebellion."

"I'm shocked at the countless hundreds of millions of dollars that have been spent over the years in the desperate and fruitless search for extraterrestrial life," Ham wrote back then.

Christian denominations and traditions have different standpoints on the possibility of alien life. The Roman Catholic Church, for instance, has never declared a concrete position on the matter, but back in May 2014 Pope Francis suggested that alien life forms, should they exist, would also be welcomed to celebrate Mass.

"If, for example, tomorrow an expedition of Martians came, and some of them came to us, here ... Martians, right? Green, with that long nose and big ears, just like children paint them. ... And one says, 'But I want to be baptized!' What would happen?" Francis said during a speech focused on the question "Who are we to close the doors to the Holy Spirit?"