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Current Page: Politics | Monday, April 20, 2015
Marco Rubio Says Being Gay 'Not a Choice;' Ex-Gay Christian Says Senator's Statement Reflects Pro-Gay Culture

Marco Rubio Says Being Gay 'Not a Choice;' Ex-Gay Christian Says Senator's Statement Reflects Pro-Gay Culture

Republican U.S. Senator and possible presidential candidate for 2016 Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks during an appearance in Hollis, New Hampshire February 23, 2015. | (Photo: Reuters/Brian Snyder)

Republican 2016 presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio from Florida, said Sunday that he does not believe homosexuality is a choice but "something that people are born with." He also said he believes marriage should be "between one man and one woman" while insisting "it's not that I'm against gay marriage."

"Sexual preferences are a choice for the vast and enormous majority of people. In fact, the bottom line is, I believe sexual preference is something that people are born with," said Rubio on CBS's "Face the Nation."

In an interview with Fusion's Jorge Ramos last week, Rubio, who is a strong Catholic also explained that despite his religious beliefs he would attend a gay wedding if it was for a family member or a friend.

"If it's somebody in my life that I care for, of course I would," Rubio told Ramos when asked if he would attend a gay wedding for a gay close friend or family member.

"I'm not going to hurt them simply because I disagree with a choice they've made or because I disagree with a decision they've made, or whatever it may be," he added. "Ultimately, if someone that you care for and is part of your family has decided to move in one direction or another or feels that way because of who they love, you respect that because you love them."

"I'm a member of the Catholic faith that teaches, for example, that divorce is wrong," he continued. "But if someone gets divorced, I'm not going to stop loving them or having them [be] a part of our lives."

McKrae Game, a self-described former homosexual Christian and president of Hope for Wholeness which provides Christian counselling for those struggling with same-sex attraction told The Christian Post Monday that while he agrees with Rubio that same-sex attraction is not a choice he does not support same-sex marriage.

"As a former homosexual in ministry to those who are trying to reconcile their faith with the effects of the issue, I would agree with Rubio's assertion that individuals do not choose to have same-sex attractions," Game told CP.

But when it comes to attending a gay wedding, he said he would "choose other means to be compassionate. Regardless of our methods, our goal as believers should be to follow Christ and to lead others — including our gay neighbors — to do the same."

Game argued that Rubio's position on homosexuality is a reflection of the current pro-gay culture in America. And he blames that, in part, on how the church has treated the issue.

"In part, this is the fault of the church that, rather than speaking the truth in love, has been silent or ignorant on the issue of homosexuality," he said.

In the absence of constructive dialogue "Christians have been educated by a biased media and an ever-growing pro-gay culture," he noted.

"I would even go so far as to say that, while it may be obvious that they (homosexuals) choose to act on their attractions, we rarely use this language when referring to other behavior labeled sinful by the Bible. Doing so, labeling any form of homosexuality a choice, tends to set this issue apart as special or worse," said Game.

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