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Ask Chuck: I hate my job

Ask Chuck your money question

Dear Chuck,

I really hate my job. I want to quit, but I was taught that it is better to find a job before you quit what you have. Any tips for finding a job before bailing out of this miserable situation? 

Stuck in a Bad Job

Chuck Bentley
(Courtesy of Christian Economic Forum)

Dear Stuck in a Bad Job, 

I have lots of advice that will be helpful for you.

Be grateful 

The first tip is to be grateful for what you have no matter how hard or difficult it is. Looking back on my own journey, I started working outside of our home at age 14. I have had plenty of bad bosses or just plain hard work. Yet, I always learned something that built my character, taught me a new skill, or benefited my life in some way. 

Don’t jump ship quickly 

One of my sons was doing contract work for an organization that clearly treated him unfairly.  There were lots of reasons to quit, walking out of the commitment he had made. When he asked for my advice, I encouraged him to complete the remaining 3 months of the contract even though he was not being paid what he was promised. He stuck it out. Looking back on it today, it was during those three painful months that the biggest breakthroughs in his career began to happen. Coincidence? I don’t believe in them. God used the character qualities of humility and perseverance on display in my son’s life to bless him.

Don’t burn bridges

You should avoid burning bridges unless absolutely necessary because it forever alters a relationship. There is no turning back to the way things used to be. Once something is said or done, the “burn” can permanently scar. 

  • It is a small world. You never know who people know and what their roles might be in your future.
  • Treat others as you would want to be treated.
  • Respond with emotional intelligence so you have no regrets. 
  • Do not react in anger. Do not gossip. God can change people in miraculous ways. 
  • Consider consequences and your reputation. 
  • Act as God’s ambassador to bring Him glory. Outdo others in showing honor. 
  • Listen and learn from your experiences. Be patient, and trust God through the process.

Life is built around relationships and connectivity. Good relationships build more relationships. They expand your business and influence. Referrals and references result from your connections with others. People are important. Fellowship and community are life-giving in business, church, neighborhood, family, and friendships. In fact, healthy relationships ultimately impact your emotional and physical wellbeing.

Some relationships are beneficial. Some are not. Discernment is key to determining when to move on from people who struggle with sin like self-control, anger, pride, misplaced dependency, etc. 

There are times when distance is necessary. If something unethical is asked of you, or you discover it in your employer, do not compromise. If you are in any sort of danger, get help. 

Seek wise counsel. And remember to hold your tongue to avoid false accusations, slander, or gossip. 

“He who loves purity of heart, and whose speech is gracious, will have the king as his friend” (Proverbs 22:11 ESV).

Transform your job, or look for another one

Oftentimes, people who hate their jobs have never analyzed the reason why. Have you? What is it that makes you miserable? Are you working outside of your gifts and talents? Check out Crown’s Career Direct assessment to learn of your unique design. Are you bored or frustrated with your responsibility? Ask for a new challenge, or a transfer to an area you enjoy more. Are you working with people that you do not get along with? Seek to be a peacemaker and transform your work relationships and office environment. If this does not help, make a plan to find a new job. 

I believe it is true that the best time to look for a job is when you are employed. Ask family, your friends, folks you know at church, or even a professional search firm to help you find what you are looking for. Most jobs today are found through personal referrals which is why it is important to remember the advice I started with. Don’t forget to summarize your job search into two sentences or less so others can understand very specifically what you want. Here is an example: “I am looking for a job in advertising sales with an online company, and I need a base salary plus commissions. I’m willing to relocate but prefer to work from home.” Share this as you seek help from others so they can do more than just wish you well. 

In some rare cases, you may be able to discuss your desire to find a new job with your current boss or team. This often is a very helpful decision on many levels. Don’t do this if you are working in a hostile environment or in a company that is not built upon trust and mutual respect.

Pray

The Lord knows what you need. Invite Him into your current misery and your job search. He can open doors and move mountains to get you where He wants you to serve.

If you do find yourself in a situation where you are cash-strapped, Christian Credit Counselors may be able to provide some guidance. They are a trusted source of help, seeking to free individuals and families from the burden of credit card debt.

Chuck Bentley is CEO of Crown Financial Ministries, a global Christian ministry, founded by the late Larry Burkett. He is the host of a daily radio broadcast, My MoneyLife, featured on more than 1,000 Christian Music and Talk stations in the U.S., and author of his most recent book, Seven Gray Swans: Trends that Threaten Our Financial Future. Be sure to follow Crown on Facebook.

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