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Current Page: Politics | Tuesday, August 16, 2016
Donald Trump's New 'Ideological Screening Test' for Immigrants: Oppose Bigotry and Hatred, Support Tolerance

Donald Trump's New 'Ideological Screening Test' for Immigrants: Oppose Bigotry and Hatred, Support Tolerance

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio August 15, 2016. | (Photo: REUTERS/Eric Thayer)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump announced his plans for countering Islamic terrorism and admitting refugees to America in a Monday speech, saying he would implement an ideological test for migrants to see if they agree with Americans on anti-bigotry and tolerance values.

"In the Cold War, we had an ideological screening test. The time is long overdue to develop a new screening test for the threats we face today. I call it extreme vetting. I call it extreme, extreme vetting," Trump said in Ohio, according to a transcript of his remarks. "Our country has enough problems. We don't need more."

The proposed test would include questions to see if refugee applicants agree with Western liberal values related to anti-hate, anti-bigotry and religious tolerance.

Trump, who had previously proposed to ban all Muslims coming to America while terror concerns are still high, now explained that he would only ban immigrants from countries where terrorism is widespread and there is poor vetting, but did not give out a list of nations he had in mind.

A spokesman for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton slammed Trump's plan, calling it a "cynical ploy."

"This so-called 'policy' cannot be taken seriously," the Clinton campaign said.

"How can Trump put this forward with a straight face when he opposes marriage equality and selected as his running mate the man [Mike Pence] who signed an anti-LGBT law in Indiana?"

It continued: "It's a cynical ploy to escape scrutiny of his outrageous proposal to ban an entire religion from our country and no one should fall for it."

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio, August 15, 2016. | (Photo: Reuters/Eric Thayer)

The billionaire businessman insisted, however, that migrants coming to America must show that they agree with U.S. values on religious freedom, gender equality and gay rights, though he did not outline the phrasing of the potential questions.

"Those who do not believe in our Constitution, or who support bigotry and hatred, will not be admitted for immigration into the country," Trump said. "Only those who we expect to flourish in our country — and to embrace a tolerant American society — should be issued visas."

As for tackling the Islamic State terror group and other major threats, the Republican nominee said that under his administration the U.S. would seek to partner with any country that is willing to join it in the fight against extremism.

"International cooperation to cut off their funding, expanded intelligence sharing and cyberwarfare to disrupt and disable their propaganda and recruiting . . . It's got to be stopped," he said.

As he has in the past, Trump said that finding "common ground" and partnering with Russia against IS would be a "good thing" and an important step toward defeating the Islamic militants.

Trump also took a shot at Clinton, arguing that she "lacks the judgment ... stability and temperament and moral character to lead our nation."

"She also lacks the mental and physical stamina to take on ISIS. And all of the many adversaries that we face," Trump added.

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