My Open Letter to President Obama

The views expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the editorial opinion of The Christian Post or its editors.
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Susan Stamper Brown Susan Stamper Brown is an Alaskan resident and recovering political pundit who does her best to make sense of current day events using her faith. She tries to read every email sent to her at writestamper@gmail.com or join her Facebook page

I write this letter in response to your May 12 visit to Georgetown University where, in a so-called religious setting, you urged conservatives and liberals to unify to fight poverty. Helping those in need is a cause that touches the heart of God, so I was a little encouraged until you took a potshot at Speaker of the House John Boehner and Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell, insinuating they could care less about the plight of the poor.

Your insinuation was offensive, revealing that even in helping others you cannot help insulting your political opponents. And obviously, biting your tongue doesn't work. What you really need is a change of heart. Until that happens, little else matters. At Georgetown, you claimed to be a "Christian" to propagate your socialistic agenda to fight poverty, then simultaneously sucker punched Christianity when you bragged about your support of abortion and same sex marriage. It is my belief you'd be much more respected if you'd drop the whole "Christianity" thing and admit what you really believe. If you or anyone else insist they are a true believer in Jesus Christ, then it would be best to try and live as the Bible instructs us. It'll fundamentally transform your life when it fills you with the kind of hope and change that has nothing to do with government.

Truth is, the income inequality gap has widened over the past six years, pumping more taxpayer money out of wallets and into the bottomless pit of Washington. According to a January 7, 2014 report in The Washington Times, the poverty level under your watch broke a 50-year record. Rail on income inequality all you wish, but "a record 47 million Americans receiving food stamps, about 13 million more than when he [you] took office" is nothing to brag about. Maybe it's time for your party to drop its income inequality obsession and join with conservatives to focus on policies which help every American reach their potential.

An honest glance at the red-swathed map after the 2014 midterm elections will help you see you've lost a massive amount of support from God-fearing, hard-working citizens who feel they've lost their voice and America has lost her way. At Georgetown, you seemed befuddled that you can't gain the support you want from conservatives. Besides the fact that it's impossible to get anything done when those around you are preoccupied with extinguishing the divisive brush fires you persistently ignite, it's really quite simple. Cramming controversial things into bills which force people to choose between their religious beliefs and a particular regulation set you up for failure. You may find strained definition of law to pass a bill like Obamacare, but you lose the conscience of a nation and the support of good people.

It seems that deep within you burns a bitterness toward those with whom you disagree, likely derived from spending too much time with certain friends, mentors and associates that some Americans feel are not positive influences on you or our country. When we surround ourselves with that kind of negativity, little good follows. That, coupled with a core belief that America must pay reparation for past mistakes in perpetuity leads to the kind of anti-Americanism some pastors have espoused after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks when some said, America should be damned, not blessed, getting what she deserved when her chickens came "home to roost."

With less than two years to go in your presidency, 543 days, 17 hours and 18 minutes (at the time of this writing) to be exact, not that I'm counting, concerns about your legacy must surely keep you awake at night and reasonably disturbed between golf and basketball games. The self-avowed unifier turned out to be a divider. With poverty rising and racial unrest at record levels, it might be prudent to avoid adding to your legacy as the first black president, the title of worst.

Susan Stamper Brown Susan Stamper Brown is an Alaskan resident and recovering political pundit who does her best to make sense of current day events using her faith. She tries to read every email sent to her at writestamper@gmail.com or join her Facebook page