Benham Brothers: Bloodshed in the Womb Leads to Bloodshed on the Streets

(Photo: Reuters/Brian Frank)Business leaders David (L) and Jason Benham, whose reality show was cancelled following comments against same-sex marriage, speak at the Family Leadership Summit in Ames, Iowa August 9, 2014. The Family Leader, a pro-family Iowa organization, is hosting the event in conjunction with national partners Family Research Council Action and Citizens United.

Outspoken Christian real estate entrepreneurs Jason and David Benham say last week's shooting deaths of two black men by police officers in Louisiana and Minnesota and the killing of five police officers in Dallas are major signs that America is entrenched in a godless "culture of death."

The twin brothers — who gained prominence among conservative Christians when HGTV dropped their reality TV show amid pressure from LGBT activist groups opposed to their biblical view of marriage — took to Facebook last Friday to issue their thoughts about the killing of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling by police officers in Minneapolis and Baton Rouge and the killing of five Dallas police officers last Thursday.

In a video posted to their Facebook page, the former minor league baseball players stressed that the acts of violence displayed last week are side effects caused by the "removal of God from every area of the nation."

"In Genesis 6, the Lord talks about how the Earth was void of God and 'filled with violence,'" David Benham explained. "Right out of the beginning of time, when we see that we remove God, when we remove God from our lives, from our culture, from every area of our nation, violence will fill the void."

"The scripture continues in the book of Ezekiel. It says, 'bloodshed follows bloodshed.' And, we're watching violence of unprecedented order. I can't even believe we blew up a dude," David Benham added, referring to how Dallas police officers used a robot to blow up the man believed to have shot the officers. "This is craziness."

Jason Benham then argued that America's "culture of death" began when aspects of Christianity were banned from the classroom in the 1960s.

"You look in the 1960s, we removed prayer from school, Bible readings from school, the Ten Commandments were taken off of the wall. And then in response to that, 1973, abortion," Jason Benham said. "It's the culture of death that follows any time God has been removed."

Jason Benham then added that there is a direct correlation between the acceptance of "bloodshed in the womb" and the blood that was spilled in the streets last week.

"Because of the bloodshed in the womb, now we are starting to see it in the streets," Jason Benham said. "I'm telling you, it is because we as a nation have left God."

Although many feel like African-Americans and other minorities are still being treated unfairly by police in America, Jason Benham stressed that violence is never the answer. He compared the difference in approaches between Civil Rights leaders Malcolm X and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

"Think about the two different men — Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. Both of those guys were Civil Rights leaders but Malcolm X was doing it from a standard of black power — 'We are going to go and kill the people who are killing us,'" Jason Benham said. "Then, you have got Martin Luther King Jr., who came with a Bible, the open Bible. He said, 'The only thing that can transform our society so that people are judged not by the color of their skin but the content of their character, it was Jesus Christ coming into the human heart.' We get back to God and then that transformation takes place. Now, we have a day that honors Martin Luther King Jr. and not Malcolm X."

David Benham concluded by stressing that only Christ can alleviate the anger and hate in people's hearts.

"There is not a police force that is big enough to make a man do what is right. But there is another King who will step into the heart of a man and change him from the inside out and put his feet on a rock and put a new song in his mouth," David Benham said. "We need Jesus in this nation."

Follow Samuel Smith on Twitter: @IamSamSmith