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Ebola Patient Thomas Eric Duncan Dies; Public Officials Extend Their Condolences to His Family

Ebola Patient Thomas Eric Duncan Dies; Public Officials Extend Their Condolences to His Family

Josephus Weeks (R), nephew of Thomas Eric Duncan, the first patient diagnosed with Ebola on U.S. soil, gets a hug from a supporter at a prayer vigil for his uncle in Dallas, Texas, October 7, 2014. Duncan, who was in critical condition and on a ventilator and kidney dialysis, died at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, Wednesday, October 8, 2014. | (Photo: Reuters/Jim Young)
Nowai Korkoyah, the mother of Thomas Eric Duncan, the first patient diagnosed with Ebola on U.S. soil, attends a news conference with Reverend Jesse Jackson (L), and Duncan's nephew, Josephus Weeks, (R), in Dallas, Texas, October 7, 2014. Duncan, who was in critical condition and on a ventilator and kidney dialysis, died at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, Wednesday, October 8, 2014. | (Photo: Reuters/Jim Young)
A Red Cross worker leaves after delivering food to the apartment unit in The Ivy Apartments where a man diagnosed with the Ebola virus was staying in Dallas, Texas, October 2, 2014. Up to 100 people may have had direct or indirect contact with the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, and four people have been quarantined in a Dallas apartment, health officials said on Thursday. | (Photo: Reuters/Mike Stone)
Texas Governor Rick Perry speaks at a media conference at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, Texas October 1, 2014. U.S. health experts in Dallas on Wednesday were examining how many people may have been exposed to Ebola, just one day after the first case of the deadly virus was diagnosed in the United States, the nation's top public health official said. | (Photo: Reuters/Mike Stone)
A general view of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, Texas, October 1, 2014. U.S. health experts in Dallas on Wednesday were examining how many people may have been exposed to Ebola, just one day after the first case of the deadly virus was diagnosed in the United States, the nation's top public health official said. | (Photo: Reuters/Mike Stone)
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Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan, 42, who became the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States on Sept. 30, died Wednesday.

"It is with profound sadness and heartfelt disappointment that we must inform you of the death of Thomas Eric Duncan at 7:51 a.m. Mr. Duncan succumbed to an insidious disease, Ebola. He fought courageously in this battle. Our professionals, the doctors and nurses in the unit, as well as the entire Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas community, are also grieving his passing. We have offered the family our support and condolences at this difficult time," said a statement from Texas Health Resources.

A report in The New York Times said Duncan was being treated with the experimental antiviral drug brincidofovir. He had been listed as nonresponsive and critical as his condition worsened over the last few days.

"My thoughts are with the family and friends of Thomas Eric Duncan at this time, especially his fiancée Louise, their son, Karsiah, and all those who loved him," said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins in a statement. "We are also thinking of the dedicated hospital staff who assisted Mr. Duncan daily while he fought this terrible disease. We offer prayers of comfort and peace to everyone impacted by his passing."

Thomas Eric Duncan. | (Photo: Facebook)

Dr. David Lakey of the Texas Department of State Health Services said the past week was "an enormous test of our health system," according to NBC News. He also offered condolences to Duncan's family.

"The doctors, nurses and staff at Presbyterian provided excellent and compassionate care, but Ebola is a disease that attacks the body in many ways. We'll continue every effort to contain the spread of the virus and protect people from this threat," he said.

Duncan first arrived in the United States at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport on Sept. 20 from Liberia in West Africa, where Ebola has killed more than 3,400 people.

He first went to the emergency room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital on Sept. 25, but was released by the hospital. He returned three days later on Sept. 28 when he was admitted after his condition had worsened.

Contact: leonardo.blair@christianpost.comFollow Leonardo Blair on Twitter: @leoblairFollow Leonardo Blair on Facebook: LeoBlairChristianPost

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