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Current Page: Politics | Thursday, April 07, 2016
Feminists Can Be Pro-Life, But Abortion Should Be Legal Until Time of Birth, Hillary Clinton Says

Feminists Can Be Pro-Life, But Abortion Should Be Legal Until Time of Birth, Hillary Clinton Says

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to reporters outside Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York, April 7, 2016. | (Photo: REUTERS/Brendan McDermid)

Democratic primary frontrunner Hillary Rodham Clinton recently stated in an interview that a fully developed baby can be aborted, even on their due date.

During a recent appearance on The View, Clinton was asked by Paula Faris if she believed that there should be any legal protections, even "just hours before delivery," offered for a baby in the womb.

"Under our law that is the case, Paula. I support Roe v Wade," stated Clinton, referencing the controversial landmark 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision.

"I think that it's an important statement about the importance of a woman making this most difficult decision with consultation by whom she chooses — her doctor, her faith, her family. And under the law and under certainly that decision, that is the way we structured it."

In the same interview, Candace Cameron Bure of The View asked the presidential hopeful if she believed that someone can be pro-life and pro-feminist.

"Yes, I do, absolutely," replied Clinton, who when asked by Bure if being pro-life and feminist were "mutually exclusive" added "no, no."

Protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. | (Photo: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

"We've been in these conversations now for 40-plus years and I respect the opinions and beliefs of every woman."

Throughout her public career, Clinton has been staunchly pro-choice. In 2004, for example she spoke at the major pro-choice rally "March for Women's Lives."

While a member of Congress she voted against proposed legislation like the partial birth abortion ban and a mandatory parental notification when a minor has an abortion.

In previous years Clinton had already received a 100 percent rating from NARAL Pro-Choice America and a 0 percent rating from the National Right to Life Committee.

In January, the Planned Parenthood Action Fund announced their endorsement of the Clinton campaign, the first such endorsement the pro-choice group had ever given out in their roughly 100 years of existence.

"Hillary Clinton holds the strongest record on reproductive rights of all presidential contenders in not just this election, but in American history. She doesn't just support women's health — she has been a proactive leader on expanding access to women's health care," stated PPFA.

"We live in an era where access to birth control, abortion, and services at Planned Parenthood are under unprecedented attack. With so much at stake, we can't afford to have a president who continues these attacks — or who won't stand strong and fight against them, no matter what."

Clinton recently garnered controversy for stating in an interview with Meet the Press that while she believes fetuses an "unborn person doesn't have constitutional rights."

Nicole Russell of The Federalist noted that even if accidental Clinton's phrasing was "significant" since she was basically conceding a core argument of the pro-life movement.

"Hold up: Either the baby is a blob with zero rights, or the baby is a person with rights. One cannot have both in any morally sound, intellectually honest universe," wrote Russell.

"If the person is a person, no matter how small, and thus has rights, regardless of location (i,e. womb) should not it retain constitutional rights, the same as everyone else?"

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