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Over 120 black leaders blast systemic racism within Planned Parenthood: 'Too many black lives lost to abortion'

Over 120 black leaders blast systemic racism within Planned Parenthood: 'Too many black lives lost to abortion'

Demonstrators gather during a protest vigil sponsored by The Christian Defense Coalition and Priests for Life outside of the Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington, D.C., Carol Whitehill Moses Center on January 17, 2019 in Washington, D.C. | Getty Images/Zach Gibson

Over 120 black American leaders in both parties have signed a document addressed to Planned Parenthood, urging it to confront systemic racism inherent in the abortion industry and the legacy of its founder, Margaret Sanger.

“Today, we are saying emphatically and unequivocally that Planned Parenthood must confront its racist founding, mission and practices. Too many Black lives have been lost to abortion. All Black lives matter," the letter reads.  

Among those who have signed the letter are Louisiana state Senator Katrina Jackson, Georgia state representative Mack Jackson, and Michigan's Kent County Commissioner Monica Sparks, all of whom are Democrats. Black Republican signers include Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill and Texas state representative James White. Conservative think tank Heritage Foundation President Kay Coles James, former NFL star Benjamin Watson and pro-life activist Alveda King, who is the niece of Martin Luther King Jr. also signed the letter.

Pro-life advocates have long pointed out that the vast majority of Planned Parenthood clinics are located in predominantly racial minority neighborhoods.

The letter, which is addressed to Planned Parenthood's acting president, Alexis McGill Johnson, reads: “The impact of abortion on Black communities is unequal and disproportionate.

“Despite constituting only 13% of the female population, Black women represent 36% of all abortions, and Black women are five times more likely than white women to receive an abortion. In some cities, like New York, more Black children are aborted every year than are born alive.

“This is no accident. Across the country, Planned Parenthood’s surgical facilities target minority communities for abortion. In fact, 79% of Planned Parenthood’s surgical abortion facilities are located in or near communities of color. Can Planned Parenthood really claim to care for Black lives while remaining complicit in the targeting of Black pregnant women?"

Amid ongoing social unrest with protests and resurgent national conversation about racial issues within the criminal justice system and police departments, Planned Parenthood of Greater New York recently disavowed Sanger's eugenics views. Thus far, the national headquarters of the abortion provider in Washington, D.C., has said nothing, the African-American leaders noted.

"This massive iniquity, and the disproportionate harm it does to Black Americans, is fully in keeping with the racist, eugenicist vision of your organization’s founder. Margaret Sanger wanted to use abortion and contraception to cull minority populations," the letter states.

In a statement sent to The Christian Post Tuesday, Rev. Dean Nelson, executive director of the pro-life group Human Coalition Action, said that this effort "demonstrates the outrage among the Black community that we have been strategically and consistently targeted by the abortion industry ever since the practice was legalized almost 50 years ago.” 

Their words come as employees of the abortion giant have recently spoken openly about the practices within the organization, alleging mistreatment on the basis of race and a hostile workplace environment.

Last year, Planned Parenthood's former president, Dr. Leana Wen, was ousted from her position, having only spent approximately eight months at the helm. Reports indicated her departure was the result of disagreements in vision and direction of the organization. Wen reportedly wanted to reorient and reframe the group as a healthcare provider whereas Planned Parenthood's board of directors insisted upon a stronger political advocacy approach and argued Wen's leadership was inadequate.

Wen is now an adjunct associate professor of emergency medicine at George Washington University School of Public Health.

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