Recommended

Current Page: U.S. | | Coronavirus →

Alveda King slams Kamala Harris for plagiarizing her uncle, Martin Luther King Jr.

Alveda King slams Kamala Harris for plagiarizing her uncle, Martin Luther King Jr.

U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks at a hearing of the Homeland Security Committee attended by acting U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan at the Capitol Building on June 25, 2020, in Washington, D.C. |

Alveda King, the niece of Martin Luther King Jr., slammed Vice President-elect Kamala Harris for plagiarizing a story shared by the late civil rights leader and argued that her pro-abortion stance is proof that her views are diametrically opposed to what MLK preached. 

King, an outspoken pro-life advocate, appeared on Fox Business’ “Lou Dobbs Tonight” Tuesday where Dobbs asked her about the recent revelation that Harris seemingly lifted a story about her childhood from an interview King did with Playboy magazine in 1965.

While King did not respond directly to accusations that Harris plagiarized her uncle's story, she said Harris is “nothing like Martin Luther King Jr."

“Kamala knows that her worldview is totally different from the worldview of Martin Luther King Jr. So it’s a big stretch for her to compare herself or to sound like him or use some of his same analogies.”

King specifically singled out Harris’ position on abortion as an example of her divergence from the worldview of the late civil rights leader: “For instance, Kamala believes that it’s OK to abort babies up to nine months and if you meant to abort the baby and the baby lives, then let the baby die. Martin Luther King Jr. served the public, he did not kill the public, and that would include babies in the womb. He said ‘injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.’”

Additionally, King doubled down on her criticism of Raphael Warnock, who was the Democratic candidate for one of two special Senate elections in Georgia on Tuesday. Warnock, who won the seat in the election, campaigned heavily on the fact that he preaches at the church where MLK once preached but King disputes this: “He does not, Lou, preach in the pulpit where Martin Luther King Jr. preached. He preaches across the street at the Horizon Sanctuary.”

King is technically correct, as Warnock does not preach in the same building that her uncle preached in. Instead, he preaches in a new building, the Horizon Sanctuary, which was constructed in 2009. The Horizon Sanctuary replaced the original Ebenezer Baptist Church building that King preached at, which has become a historical site. Therefore, even though Warnock does not preach in the same building as the late King once did, both have served as pastors of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

King had previously criticized Warnock’s efforts to tie himself to her late uncle in an interview with The Washington Times last week. “You are not going to pretend that the King family legacy is the same thing as what you’re promoting,” she told the paper.

“If you’re a pastor, you must stand for Christian values first and foremost,” she added. “I’m very convinced that he’s manipulating his pulpit, the Bible, and everything else.”

King’s statements to The Washington Times came less than three weeks after she joined a coalition of African American ministers in penning a letter to Warnock, telling him that “As a Christian pastor and as a Black leader, you have a duty to denounce the evil of abortion, which kills a disproportionate number of Black children.”

The signatories to the letter expressed concern about Warnock’s “open advocacy of abortion,” describing it as “a scandal to the faith and to the Black community” and shared statistics about the impact of abortion on the African American community.

In addition to discussing her concerns about Harris' and Warnock’s efforts to tie themselves to her uncle and their positions on abortion, King alleged voter fraud in the two Senate runoffs that took place in Georgia during her interview with Dobbs: “One guy that I know for sure, he went to vote and they said, ‘You’ve already voted. He says, ‘No I didn’t, I’m here to vote now.’ And they said, ‘You voted at a mobile unit.’”

“We have some irregularities,” King contended. She also talked about how during the November 2020 general election, one of her friends was told “The machine is down. We’ll scan it later.” “The same thing is happening this time, it’s happening here, right now, today in this election. They’re telling people ‘the machines are broken, we’ll scan it later.’”

Free CP Newsletters

Join over 250,000 others to get the top stories curated daily, plus special offers!

Dear CP readers,

We are in the process of transferring all past comments into our new comment platform with OpenWeb, which will take up to a week. Thank you for your patience.

In the meantime, you can post new comments now. Check the updated Commenting FAQ for more information.

Sponsored

Most Popular

More In U.S.