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Current Page: U.S. | Thursday, February 21, 2019
Couple sues Planned Parenthood because abortion pill did not kill son

Couple sues Planned Parenthood because abortion pill did not kill son

A bottle and two pills of mifepristone, also known as RU-486, are seen in a handout photo. | (PHOTO: REUTERS/NEWSCOM)

A cash-strapped couple from Idaho, who traveled 700 miles to acquire the services of a Planned Parenthood in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is now suing the abortion giant for $765,000 and other damages because the abortion pill did not kill their son.

They are now worried that the boy, who is almost 3, “may carry a defect or injury into adulthood” as a result of the failed attempt to kill him.

The couple, Bianca Coons and Cristobal Ruiz, revealed in a lawsuit cited by the Albuquerque Journal that Coons was about six weeks pregnant in February 2016 when they traveled to New Mexico to get around Idaho’s mandatory waiting period for abortions.

The couple, said the lawsuit, was “destitute and attempting to maintain and limit the size of their family” when they decided to end the pregnancy using the abortion pill.

Coons took the first of two pills required in the abortion process at the Planned Parenthood clinic on San Mateo and was instructed how to take a second pill later to end the pregnancy.

A Planned Parenthood protest in Albuquerque, N.M. in August 2015. · | Photo: Facebook

“First, you take a pill called mifepristone. This medicine stops the pregnancy from growing. Some people feel nauseous or start bleeding after taking mifepristone, but it’s not common. Your doctor or nurse may also give you antibiotics to take to prevent infection,” the Planned Parenthood website says of the process.

“The second medicine is called misoprostol. You’ll either take the misoprostol right away, or up to 48 hours after you take the first pill — your doctor or nurse will let you know how and when to take it. This medicine causes cramping and bleeding to empty your uterus,” it adds.

When the couple returned home the following day, however, Coons had to be rushed to the emergency room for dehydration. She also learned that her baby was still alive and had a strong heartbeat even though she had already taken the second pill, according to her lawyer John McCall.

Coons later contacted Planned Parenthood and requested a second dose of the abortion pill to end her pregnancy. She was offered a free dose if she returned to New Mexico but told if she wanted to get the abortion in Idaho she would have to pay for the second dose.

According to Planned Parenthood, the abortion pill can cost up to $1,000 but is usually less.

“The cost of a medication abortion varies and depends on where you get it and whether or not you have health insurance that will cover some or all of the cost. Your abortion may be free or low cost with health insurance, but some insurance plans don’t cover abortions,” the organization says on their website.

In early March, Coons, who was still pregnant, told a Planned Parenthood staff member that she could not afford “a second round of the abortion protocol.”

She had also gotten to the point where her conscience would not allow her to take the life of her child.

“The fetus had now developed to somewhere around nine weeks. Ms. Coons could not morally sanction further action to terminate the fetus,” the lawsuit said.

The couple was warned by the abortion giant that giving birth to a child they attempted to kill with the abortion pill was risky as the medication could result in birth defects.

Their son was born a month early “with jaundice and blood sugar issues.” They are also now concerned that their child might not grow up into a fully functional adult.

“The defendant’s failure to properly supervise and administer the abortion service directly resulted in the failure of the pregnancy termination which resulted in injury to plaintiffs’ interests in family planning and their interests in financial planning for the future of their family,” the lawsuit argues.

The couple has named various medical personnel, the hospital where Coons sought treatment as well as two Planned Parenthood branches in the lawsuit, seeking $765,000 in compensatory damages.

They are also seeking damages for breach of contract, unfair trade practices, violation of consumer protection laws and emotional distress, among other claims, the Journal reported.

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