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‘I believe prayer works,’ Rush Limbaugh says in cancer treatment update

‘I believe prayer works,’ Rush Limbaugh says in cancer treatment update

Radio personality Rush Limbaugh reacts after First Lady Melania Trump gives him the Presidential Medal of Freedom during the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives on February 04, 2020, in Washington, D.C. | Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh, who was diagnosed with advanced-stage lung cancer earlier this year, shared an update about his treatment, saying he’s been going through ups and downs but “I believe prayer works.”

“There are good days, good weeks. There are bad days and bad weeks,” Limbaugh, who was diagnosed on Jan. 22, wrote on his website.

“This past period, this past treatment, which was a week ago tomorrow, this has been much better than I thought,” said the talk show host, who began his nationally syndicated radio show about 30 years ago.

“Because of the cumulative effect of the toxicity, I was expecting to be, you know, in that just debilitating fatigue for 10 days. And I wasn’t. It lasted two days, Thursday and Friday. The weekend was good. But, again, anything can change rapidly and on a dime. So, it’s a blessing.”

Limbaugh, 69, added, “I believe prayer works. I know it does.”

Using a baseball analogy, Fox News opinion host Limbaugh said it was “a blessing that in my third at-bat, the last shot that I had at this, I got on base and I stole second, and I’m chugging on to third, and I’m very confident that I’m gonna score.”

“I’m very confident that this is gonna go into extra innings. Meaning — well, you know what it means. I’m trying to avoid being specific in the lingo here. And, again, that’s simply because of how rapidly things can change with this kind of diagnosis.”

Limbaugh said he was “feeling extremely good right now, even cautious about saying that. Who knows what tomorrow’s gonna bring... I could be even more optimistic if I wanted to because there is reason to be, but, again, when every phase and stage happens that’s an improvement, I’ll be sure and pass it on.”

While announcing he had been diagnosed with cancer in January, Limbaugh said, “This day has been one of the most difficult days in recent memory, for me, because I’ve known this moment was coming. I’m sure that you all know by now that I really don’t like talking about myself and I don’t like making things about me. … One thing that I know, that has happened over the 31-plus years of this program, is that there has been an incredible bond that has developed between all of you and me.”

In February, Limbaugh was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

“Almost every American family knows the pain when a loved one is diagnosed with a serious illness,” Trump said at the time. “Here tonight is a special man, beloved by millions of Americans, who just received a Stage 4 advanced cancer diagnosis. This is not good news, but what is good news is that he is the greatest fighter and winner that you will ever meet.”

Trump thanked Limbaugh for “decades of tireless devotion to our country.” 

“And, Rush, in recognition of all that you have done for our nation, the millions of people a day that you speak to and that you inspire, and all of the incredible work that you have done for charity, I am proud to announce tonight that you will be receiving our country’s highest civilian honor: the Presidential Medal of Freedom,” Trump declared.

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