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Canadian Terry Fox Inspires 'Marathon of Hope,' World's Largest 1-Day Fundraiser for Cancer Research

Canadian Terry Fox Inspires 'Marathon of Hope,' World's Largest 1-Day Fundraiser for Cancer Research

A father and his daughter ride through Prado Boulevard while participating in the 7th Terry Fox Marathon of Hope, in Havana February 8, 2004. The marathon is held annually to raise funds for cancer research and to honor Canadian Terry Fox, who was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 18 in 1977. With his right leg partially amputated, Fox started to run a marathon every day across Canada, completing 5,373 km, until he was forced to stop as the cancer had spread to his lungs. Fox died at the age of 22. | (Photo: Reuters/Claudia Daut)
Canada's Prime Minister Paul Martin (R) walks with Betty Fox (2nd R), the mother of the late marathoner Terry, during the annual Terry Fox Run in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, east of Vancouver, September 18, 2005. This year is the 25th anniversary of Terry's Marathon of Hope in which he attempted to run across Canada to raise money but was forced to stop after his cancer returned. Also taking part are Sheila Martin (2nd L), Martin's wife, Rick Hanson (wheelchair) and Premier Gordon Campbell (C back). Some 400 million dollars has been raised for cancer research since the annual walks, held around the world, were started following Terry's death in 1981. | (Photo: Reuters/Andy Clark)
Betty Fox, Rolly Fox (C) and Darrell Fox (R), family of the Marathon of Hope's Terry Fox, gather in front of drawings for a new statue to be erected in honour of Terry in Vancouver, British Columbia January 18, 2011. Terry, with one leg having been amputated, set off on a cross-Canada run in 1980 to raise money and awareness for cancer research but was forced to end his quest after 143 days and later died of cancer in 1981. | (Photo: Reuters/Andy Clark)
Participants run in the 12th Terry Fox Marathon of Hope in Havana, Cuba, March 20, 2010. The marathon is held annually to raise funds for cancer research and to honor Canadian Terry Fox, who was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 18 in 1977. With his right leg partially amputated, Fox started to run a marathon every day across Canada, completing 5,373 km (3,339 miles), until he was forced to stop as the cancer had spread to his lungs. Fox died at the age of 22. | (Photo: Reuters/Stringer)
A man walks past the statue honoring runner Terry Fox on the 25th anniversary of the start of his marathon across Canada for cancer research, in Ottawa, April 12, 2005. Fox, who lost his leg to bone cancer, ran 5,373 kilometers over 143 days using a prosthetic leg before the recurrence of cancer eventually killed him. | (Photo: Reuters/Jim Young)
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Terry Fox was a successful athlete who excelled in basketball and distance running. But at the the age of 18, he was diagnosed with cancer, and following an operation was left with one leg. An amputee, Terry decided to take action and started running cross-country in Canada to raise money for cancer research. For 35 years, his legacy has sparked a worldwide fundraiser known as the Marathon of Hope, which will be held on Sunday.

Today, Terry's memorialized in many different ways: statues, documentaries and most of all, the Terry Fox Run for cancer research. This charitable run was founded in 1981 and is now supported in over 60 countries, making it the largest one-day fundraiser for cancer research.

Will you be participating in the international Terry Fox Run on Sunday?

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