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Pro-abortion ACLU and SisterSong sue Georgia to protect black genocide

Pro-abortion ACLU and SisterSong sue Georgia to protect black genocide

Ryan Bomberger is the co-founder of The Radiance Foundation.

Do you ever feel that real life is just too surreal to be true? Racists are now the ones who believe that we’re all created equal and that #blacklivesmatter in and out of the womb.

Guess my brown self is a racist.

Georgia, which recently passed the Living Infants Fairness and Equality (LIFE) Act, aka Heartbeat Bill (HB481), is in the center of this surreality.  

Black pro-abortion activists and abortion businesses have filed a lawsuit to stop HB481. The pro-abortion ACLU has sued the state of Georgia for its efforts to stop the violence of abortion which happens disproportionately in black communities—at rates 4.3 times higher than the majority population. Of the 27,453 abortions in Georgia in 2017, a shocking 60.7% were black babies even though African-Americans comprise only 32.2% of the state’s population. SisterSong, a far-left group of black pro-abortion activists, is leading the legal challenge to ensure the number one killer of black lives is protected.

Loretta Ross, the founder of SisterSong, acknowledges what pro-lifers have been declaring for decades: “Because we’re women of color that come from communities always subjected to population control schemes, we fight equally hard for the right to have our children.” 

Well, not too hard. SisterSong, now led by Monica Simpson, was created in 1997 with a grant from the world’s most powerful population control entity—the Ford Foundation. Since 2006, the largest funder of global abortion schemes has given the “grassroots” activist group $1,665,000 to promote black genocide.

In another interview, Ross admits: “The best way to fight population control, to fight genocide, is to make sure the objects of that genocide or that control make those decisions for themselves.” How does one combat genocide with abortion? 

“If you’re a Black woman in America, it’s statistically safer to have an abortion than to carry a pregnancy to term or give birth.” This is a tweet from Planned Parenthood—the leading killer of black lives—which has funded SisterSong to the tune of $246,000 from 2015 to 2017 (see here, here, here, and here). 

I guess “reproductive justice” sounds better than population control. 

Nine years ago, something happened in Atlanta that shook pro-abortion activists to their very hanger-emblazoned core. The Radiance Foundation, which my wife and I began in Georgia, launched the first public ad campaign to deal with abortion’s devastating and disproportionate impact in the black community. TooManyAborted.com garnered massive media coverage from coast to coast, from the New York Times to the LA Times. 

SisterSong fought to remove our billboards. They failed. Their ally, Planned Parenthood, helda national meeting in their NYC headquarters to combat our messaging—in the city where, for years, more black babies have been aborted than born alive. The abortion giant produced a 20 minute crockumentary, called “A Vital Service”, demonizing us while casting themselves as the savior of the black community. They launched political initiatives like African-Americans for Planned Parenthood (now called Planned Parenthood Black Community) and poured more money into SisterSong, now the main plaintiff in this lawsuit against Governor Brian Kemp.

Black women need abortion…it saves lives. Well, only at the intersection of eugenics and white supremacy. The national maternal mortality rate (MMR) plummeted 96% (from 916.4 deaths per 100,000 live births to 33.3 deaths per 100,000 live births) between 1918 and 1964, before legalized contraception and abortion. According to the CDC, better healthcare (including antibiotics like penicillin and safe blood transfusions) accounted for such profound declines in maternal and infant deaths. MMR dropped to a rate of 18.8 in 1972 before Roe, 15.2 in 1973 and climbed back up to 15.1 in 2005 despite tens of millions of abortions. 

SisterSong’s Simpson claims that “black women in our state are dying at rates six times higher than the national average.” False. 

According to the CDC, the national overall Pregnancy Mortality Ratio (PMR) was 18 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2014 (the latest year for PMR data in GA). Georgia’s PMR for black mothers was 47 deaths per 100,000 live births which is 2.6 times higher—not 6 times higher. It’s also similar to the CDC’s national PMR for black women of 43 deaths per 100,000 live births from 2011-2015.

Let’s clarify this more. In 2014, there were a total of 85 tragic maternal deaths in Georgia; 43 of those were found to be pregnancy-related. Twenty-one of those were black mothers yet 15,935 black children were aborted that same year. 

Nationwide, there are an estimated 700 tragic pregnancy-related deaths each year. Just to compare, the CDCreports that 11,685 women died in 2016 in the U.S. from motor vehicle accidents and 2,931 women died from accidental drowning. So-called feminists aren’t calling for women to stop driving cars or avoid bodies of water. But they’ll treat pregnancy like a disease to be eliminated as they promote, on page 24 of the court brief, the thoroughly debunked lie that “abortion is 14 times safer than childbirth.” 

The Georgia Maternal Mortality Review Committee, created by Republicans with SB273, examined maternal deaths in Georgia from 2012-2014. The “Maternal Mortality Report” shreds “reproductive justice” rhetoric. The committee determined that 61% of those 101 pregnancy-related deaths were preventable. Abortion wasn’t listed as a solution. 

Intentional deaths never reduce preventable deaths.  

Plaintiff Simpson claims in the court brief that: “SisterSong is bringing this lawsuit to protect maternal health.” If that were the case, she’d reject abortion on the documented basis that it significantly increases triple-negative breast cancer, preterm births, and a host of negative emotional and psychological outcomes for women. Abortion is fake health.

The most common recommendation for reducing maternal mortality is better prenatal care, but Planned Parenthood Southeast (also a plaintiff) doesn’t offer any prenatal care in its Georgia centers. None of the abortion facilities in the lawsuit provide this crucial care.

Better maternal health happens when society does a better job of paying attention to the truth. That, sadly, is being aborted in yet another political move to advance fake feminism, no matter the cost to women.

Originally posted at theradiancefoundation.org

Ryan Bomberger is the co-founder of The Radiance Foundation, an Emmy Award-winning creative professional, passionate factivist and author of Not Equal: Civil Rights Gone Wrong. He is an adoptee and adoptive father who addresses a myriad of social issues in the context of God-given purpose.

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