Recommended

Current Page: U.S. | Friday, May 31, 2019
Christine Caine: We can end sex trafficking overnight if people stop watching porn, 'Game of Thrones'

Christine Caine: We can end sex trafficking overnight if people stop watching porn, 'Game of Thrones'

Christine Caine speaks at the Passion 2019 Conference. | (Photo: Passion 2019 Conference)

International evangelist Christine Caine said the quickest way to end the sex trafficking epidemic is for people to stop consuming pornography and watching shows like HBO’s “Game of Thrones.”

Speaking last week during the Heaven Come conference, a worship gathering in Los Angeles, Caine told the audience, “I’ll tell you how to stop human trafficking, sex trafficking overnight: If people stop watching porn. … Just stop it.”

“Here I am trying to put traffickers in jail and you’re watching ‘Game of Thrones,’” she continued, referring to the show’s graphic nudity, Fox News reports.

She challenged Christians who claim to watch the show just to be “culturally relevant,” asking, "How's that going to work with a trafficker?"

The Australian evangelist leads the anti-trafficking ministry A21, which operates in 15 countries. The organization prosecutes traffickers and rescues victims in addition to focusing on combating slavery. According to A21, human trafficking is the fastest-growing criminal industry in the world, generating more than $150 billion every year.

Many types of pornography, Caine warned, are actually products of sex trafficking.

"Nothing is free," she said. "Porn costs somebody."

When believers surrender their lives to Christ, it affects everything they do, from what they watch to where they place their passion, she declared.

"The issue is not whether you are going to die, 100 percent we're all going to die," Caine said. "The issue is will you live the life God put you on this Earth to live. Will you step up into your God-given purpose and your God-given destiny and stop playing it safe, and stop living small, and start believing your God is huge and He's able to do so much more than you give him credit for?”

In addition to leading A21, Caine heads Propel, a women's organization dedicated to helping women realize their purpose, passion, and potential.

Previously, Caine shared with The Christian Post how her own experiences with betrayal and brokenness have inspired her to help give others a future.

The 52-year-old evangelist endured 12 years of childhood sexual abuse and was 33 when she discovered that she was adopted.

"You take a chick from Sydney, Australia, who was abandoned and unwanted and was abused for years, and today I'm running a global anti-trafficking organization and a global women's movement," she said. "Only God could do that. I think sometimes people see someone like me and they think that to do what I do, I've been exempt from trials and pain and suffering. In reality, I think, 'Oh no, my past has prepared me for what I do.'"

"I could've allowed my past to define my future, but God has done an unexpected thing with my life," she continued. "Through Christ, my history doesn't define my destiny. I want to encourage people that God is able to do so much more than they ever could imagine if they trust Him."

Research from Gallup in June showed that 43 percent of respondents to its annual Values and Beliefs survey said porn was "morally acceptable," a 7-point increase since 2011 when questions of that nature were first asked.

This month, Arizona passed a resolution declaring pornography a “public health crisis,” becoming the latest in a handful of states that have acknowledged its harmful effects on society.

"Potential detrimental effects on pornography users include toxic sexual behaviors, emotional, mental and medical illnesses and difficulty forming or maintaining intimate relationships," the resolution says, citing the normalization of violence, the sexualization of children and sex trafficking as among the effects of porn.

To date, Montana, Utah, South Dakota, Kansas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Louisiana, Idaho, Florida, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Virginia have formally recognized porn as a public health crisis. 

Sponsored

Most Popular

More In U.S.