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Rush Limbaugh: Joe Biden's 'darkest days ahead' comment is 'the last thing I would say'

Rush Limbaugh: Joe Biden's 'darkest days ahead' comment is 'the last thing I would say'

Radio personality Rush Limbaugh reacts after First Lady Melania Trump gives him the Presidential Medal of Freedom during the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives on February 04, 2020, in Washington, D.C. | Mark Wilson/Getty Images


Conservative talk radio show host Rush Limbaugh addressed Joe Biden’s prediction that the “darkest days” of the coronavirus pandemic are ahead on his last show of 2020, describing the president-elect's comments as “the last thing I would say.”

In addition to reflecting on his terminal cancer diagnosis, Limbaugh began Wednesday’s edition of “The Rush Limbaugh Show” by sharing the holiday message of “alleged President-elect Joe Biden,” who emphasized that “our darkest days, in the battle against COVID, are ahead of us, not behind us.”

While acknowledging that, “for some of us, that’s absolutely true,” the radio host pushed back on the tone of the message: “If I were president-elect of the country, it’s the last thing I would say. And even if I believed it, I doubt that I would put it this way.”

“What a bleak way of looking at things. During a press briefing yesterday (Dec. 22), he said the worst is yet to come in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, which is weird given that Biden has repeatedly claimed that it’s Trump who’s killing Americans with COVID,” he added.

Limbaugh contended that Biden’s frame of mind about the coronavirus runs contrary to the American spirit: “We Americans have adapted to our problems, we’ve adapted to changing evolutionary things in our lives, in our country, because of our freedom. Our freedom has allowed our adaptability. If disaster is coming our way, we don’t just sit there and endure it, we come up with ways to avoid it, to beat it back, to overcome it. But we don’t just sit there and accept it.”

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“We don’t just resign ourselves to the fact that we’re living in the darkest days because we, at least, to this point, still have the greatest degree of freedom of any people on Earth,” Limbaugh stressed. “I don’t believe our darkest days are ahead of us, I never have.”

“It’s never time to panic, folks, it’s never, ever going to be time to give up on our country. It will never be time to give up on the United States, it will never be time to give up on yourself.”

Biden’s Tuesday press briefing is not the first time he has offered a grim outlook regarding the coronavirus pandemic. At the second 2020 presidential debate, he warned of a “very dark winter.”

In an interview with Fox Business’ Maria Bartiromo the week after the 2020 presidential election, Dr. Michael Osterholm, a member of Biden’s COVID-19 Advisory Board, seconded that prediction, maintaining that “The next 12 to 14 weeks are likely to be the darkest period in this entire pandemic.”

Although Limbaugh reserved time to weigh in on Biden’s holiday message, he spent much of the opening portion of his Wednesday show expressing gratitude for the treatment he has received following his diagnosis with stage 4 advanced lung cancer: “So many people have done things this year for me and it’s, I don’t know, it’s not embarrassing, it’s just gratifying and it … has helped me to see so much so clearly about the goodness of people … and their decency, and it’s confirmed so much of my instinctive beliefs about people.”

The remarks on Limbaugh’s year-end radio show come nearly a year after his cancer diagnosis. President Donald Trump awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom during his 2020 State of the Union address on Feb. 4.

“I wasn’t expected to be alive today,” he recalled. “I wasn’t expected to make it to October and then to November and then to December and yet, here I am. And today, I’ve got some problems but I’m feeling pretty good today.”

During a broadcast of his radio program two months ago, Limbaugh credited his “personal relationship with Jesus Christ” as a source of “immense value, strength, confidence,” adding “that’s why I’m able to remain fully committed to the idea that what is supposed to happen will happen when it’s meant to.” At the same time, he revealed that his cancer has progressed, telling his listeners that “It’s tough to realize that the days where I do not think I’m under a death sentence are over.”

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