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Straight Rugby Buddies Get Married: So Why Do Gay Activists Have a Problem?

Straight Rugby Buddies Get Married: So Why Do Gay Activists Have a Problem?

Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D. is the President of the Ruth Institute.

In this story from New Zealand, two male friends (who are not gay, by the way) are about to marry each other.

Part of their motive:

Engineering student Travis McIntosh, 23, and teacher Matt McCormick, 24, will tie the knot to win a "The Edge" radio station competition and a trip to the 2015 Rugby World Cup in England.

Also, they really like each other. They have been best buds since they were six years old. They expect the marriage to last at least 2 years. Marriage has been an "easy in, easy out" proposition throughout the industrialized world since the advent of no-fault divorce. So why shouldn't these guys get married for a chance to win a cool prize?

Gay rights groups are offended.

Otago University Students' Association Queer Support coordinator Neill Ballantyne, of Dunedin, said the wedding was an "insult" because marriage equality was a "hard fought" battle for gay people. "Something like this trivializes what we fought for."

Sorry Neill. No go. You evidently did not realize that when you changed the law, you changed it for everyone. Two men can get married for any reason they want. The law does not require them to prove that they are actually "gay," or that they "love each other," however those terms might be defined in a legal context. (!)

I hate to say I told you so. But I told you so.

Back in 2010, I created this talk that showed what life under a genderless marriage regime would look like, thirty years on. The story did not contain a single "gay" or "lesbian" person. The story showed that changing the law would induce a whole series of behaviors among people who are not same sex attracted. Two men may want to get married to get off-base housing in the military. Or to get one of them a green card.

Or to win a radio contest.

Gay activists and their wealthy patrons seem surprised that they do not get to control what everyone does and why they do it.

They have not really thought through what redefining marriage will actually mean for the whole of society.

And what about Mr. McCormack and Mr. McIntosh? What will their "marriage" do to their friendship? to their lives? to their ability to form a real marriage someday?Another set of truly
innocent people led down the garden path of the Sexual Revolution.

Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D. is the President of the Ruth Institute.

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