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Current Page: U.S. | Tuesday, February 24, 2015
Supreme Court May Unleash 'Judgment From God' If They Strike Down Gay Marriage Bans, Says Controversial Activist Scott Lively

Supreme Court May Unleash 'Judgment From God' If They Strike Down Gay Marriage Bans, Says Controversial Activist Scott Lively

Pastor Scott Lively, president of Abiding Truth Ministries, recently sat down with Sandy Rios of American Family Radio to discuss his belief that homosexuality is a sign of the end times. | (Photo: Screenshot/YouTube)

A controversial conservative activist who's known for advocating against homosexuality in East Africa has warned that the United States Supreme Court could bring forth God's judgment by legalizing gay marriage.

Scott Lively, former Massachusetts gubernatorial candidate and head of Scott Lively Ministries, expressed concern about the Supreme Court's decision later this year in a column on his website.

"I don't think there is any question, biblically, that the cultural celebration of 'gay marriage' portends judgment from God," wrote Lively.

"The only real question in my mind is whether it truly signals the imminent 'beginning of sorrows' or is just another step in the path leading to God's wrath at a later time."

Lively commented that the court's likely striking down of all state level marriage amendments will be "an act of rebellion against God not seen since Noah's flood."

"Indeed, the ancient Hebrew rabbis taught that 'same-sex and bestial marriages' were the final insult to God that triggered the great flood (Talmud, Genesis Rabbah 26:5:4)," continued Lively.

"Jesus alluded to this when he warned that in the time leading to His return, wicked people would be 'marrying and giving in marriage' 'as in the days of Noah' (Matthew 24:38), when 'every intent of the thoughts of [their] heart was only evil continually,' (Genesis 6:5)."

Lively's comments come as the nation waits for the Supreme Court to hear oral arguments on whether or not states can ban same-sex marriage.

Supporters of same-sex marriage hold a rainbow flag and a rainbow umbrella outside Jefferson County Courthouse in Birmingham, Alabama February 9, 2015. Same-sex couples began marrying in Alabama on Monday despite an attempt by the conservative chief justice of the state's Supreme Court to block judges from issuing marriages licenses to gay men and women in open defiance of a January federal court ruling. | (Photo: Reuters/Marvin Gentry)

From 2004 to 2012, voters in over half of the states in the country approved constitutional amendments banning legal recognition of gay marriage.

Since the 2013 Supreme Court decision striking down a crucial component of the Defense of Marriage Act, a wave of lower level decisions have struck down several state-level amendments.

Most recently, Alabama became the 37th state to legally recognize gay marriage after the Supreme Court refused to grant a stay on a lower court's decision.

"In a 7-2 order, the justices rejected Alabama's bid to stop a federal trial judge's legalization order from taking effect Monday," reported Greg Stohr of Bloomberg.

"The state now will become the 37th where gays can marry. Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas dissented."

Many on both sides of the debate have concluded that the refusal to halt the lower court decision from taking place indicates that they will rule against the state level bans.

A longtime anti-homosexuality activist, Lively has faced trouble for his efforts overseas, as a pro-LGBT group known as Sexual Minorities Uganda sued him on the charge of human rights violations.

Sexual Minorities Uganda argued that, by promoting and contributing to the success of legislation that imposes prison sentences for people who commit aggravated homosexuality or have sex with a minor while HIV positive in the African nation, that Lively committed crimes against humanity.

U.S. District Court Judge Michael A. Ponsor allowed lawyers to "exchange discovery" on the case; however, the process remains a slow one, according to Stephanie Barry of Masslive.com.

"Ponsor set a deadline late last year for lawyers to exchange discovery but put off deadlines to file final motions and disclose information about witnesses. The next pretrial hearing is set for May 6," reported Barry.

"The complaint alleges Lively encouraged government-backed acts of violence against homosexuals as a result of his rhetoric. Lively has denied this, and has contended chiefly that his First Amendment rights protect free speech."

Regarding the U.S.'s possible experience of divine justice in the near future, Lively noted in his recent column that "homosexuality is not the only factor that will trigger the wrath of God."

"America bears the blood guilt of over 50 million unborn babies who have been slaughtered over the past half-century," added Lively.

"And we have broken the foremost commandment of the Decalogue and officially set other gods before Him through SCOTUS rulings in Everson v. Board of Education (1947) and Torcaso v. Watkins (1961), setting secular humanist government above God. … Obama's hostility to Israel probably factors in as well."

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