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Thousands Rally in Cairo to Protest Brutal Beatings

Tens of thousands took to Cairo’s streets Friday to protest the ruling military’s violent tactics against protesters and its continued control over the country’s government.

Thousands gathered in Tahrir Square Friday for the “Regaining Honor and defending the revolution” rally.

Egypt’s violent clashes between military and protesters began last week when a small group of sit-in protesters clashed with soldiers. The group was protesting the military’s continued hold in Egypt’s government.

Violence quickly escalated, resulting in the death of 17 protesters and the injury of over 500 injured in the past week.

Protesters and the international community alike became especially outraged after a YouTube video went viral. The video depicted soldiers beating a half-naked female protester as she lay in defense on the ground.

On Thursday, Egypt’s Prime minister called for a national dialogue to solve the continued problems between protesters and the military.

“I say to everyone that we must forget the past and move forward in a dialogue with all shades so that Egypt can live in peace,” Prime Minister Kamal Ganzouri said in a press conference Thursday.

Friday’s rally saw some 7,000 people turnout, evidently indicating that a “national dialogue” will not appease the demands of the protesters.

The Muslim Brotherhood political party was not one of the political groups backing the march. As the winner of both rounds of parliamentary elections, the Brotherhood has disagreed with the protesters’ demand for a hastened handover of power.

“I think that is better than arranging it as soon as possible because this may create chaos,” deputy head of the Muslim Brotherhood Essam el-Erian told Reuters.

The half-naked woman who was dragged by her hair was a special focus of Friday’s march. According to the The Associated Press, protesters chanted “The women of Egypt are a red line,” “we either die like them or we get them their rights” and “our dignity.”

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